Pressure Washingin Charleston, SC

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Power Wash Charleston, SC

Charleston is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Charleston. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Charleston comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Charleston, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Charleston are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Charleston. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Charleston. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Charleston, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Charleston, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Charleston, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

 Power Washer Charleston, SC

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Charleston, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Charleston, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

 Pressure Wash Charleston, SC

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Charleston, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Charleston, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Charleston, we work with business owners across Charleston who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Charleston, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

 Pressure Washer Charleston, SC

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Charleston, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

 Best Pressure Washer Charleston, SC

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Charleston, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Charleston, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Charleston? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Charleston, SC

Anson Street Burial Ground memorial at Charleston Gaillard Center takes shape

A new fountain soon will memorialize 36 people interred between 1760 and 1790 in a small burial ground near what now is the Charleston Gaillard Center.The memorial fountain, designed by North Carolina-based artist Stephen L. Hayes Jr., is a culminating moment in a decadelong effort to protect and honor the remains — and the legacies — of these enslaved people, six of whom were born in Africa.Spearheading the effort is the Anson Street African Burial Ground Project, but critical support has come from Spoleto Festival...

A new fountain soon will memorialize 36 people interred between 1760 and 1790 in a small burial ground near what now is the Charleston Gaillard Center.

The memorial fountain, designed by North Carolina-based artist Stephen L. Hayes Jr., is a culminating moment in a decadelong effort to protect and honor the remains — and the legacies — of these enslaved people, six of whom were born in Africa.

Spearheading the effort is the Anson Street African Burial Ground Project, but critical support has come from Spoleto Festival USA, the city of Charleston and the Gaillard Center.

City officials and civic leaders shared details about the project during a public announcement on Oct. 11.

Mayor John Tecklenburg said last week the fountain will be “a real tribute to our ancestors, the ancestors of Charleston,” and a powerful way to create a connection to early generations of enslaved people in the city.

“It’s an amazing story,” he said.

The sculpture will include 36 pairs of hands cast in bronze around the rim of a concrete basin formed by creating a bowl-shaped depression in the soil near the Anson Street burial ground. A jet of water will project from each pair. The hands will be cast using living models — people from the community selected by project leaders La’Sheia Oubré and Joanna Gilmore.

Oubré and Gilmore also will coordinate the collection of soil from each of the known and accessible African-descendant burial grounds in Charleston, they said. The soil incorporated into the memorial will symbolize the toil of enslaved and free Africans who were eventually buried in the earth upon which the city was built.

The hands will help humanize the monument as well as reference the labor enslaved people were forced to endure — labor that often involved rice fields and flowing water, Hayes said.

“Hands tell so many stories,” he said. And water refers to the cycle of life. It penetrates the ground, then covers the surface, then is absorbed once again.

The memorial fountain, therefore, is a little like a sapling that has erupted from 36 seeds planted deep in the earth long ago, Hayes said.

The idea for a memorial was first introduced soon after the remains had been discovered in 2013. The late Ade Ofunniyin led the initial effort to identify the dead and protect the site, encouraging archaeological and scientific research and conducting ceremonies to pay respect to those lost to time and history.

After pandemic-related delays, the effort was rejuvenated, thanks in part to a committee led by Brenda Lauderback, a Charleston resident and chairwoman of the board of Spartanburg-based Denny’s Corp.

About $800,000 has been raised toward a goal of a little more than $1 million, Spoleto Festival’s former General Director Nigel Redden said. Wells Fargo Bank kicked in $300,000 of that this month.

Those who stroll through the historic part of the Charleston peninsula are likely to admire the beautiful homes, churches and storefronts, but they are not likely to think of the African Americans who built them, often under duress, Redden said.

The Black hands that did the hard work of making the city too often are forgotten, just as the 36 people buried near Anson Street were forgotten.

“These people worked all their lives and at the end they had nothing,” he said. “I hope that this fountain becomes a place of contemplation. ... I think this memorial will be provocative in some way to people just walking through the city.”

Oubré said she hopes to find people who roughly match those whose remains are interred in the burial ground. The hands to be positioned around the fountain basin will reflect the characteristics of the dead, and some will hold replicas of objects found buried with them — coins, pottery shards, beads and buttons.

Hopefully, the people drawn to the memorial will step foot in the Gaillard Center to read about this history, and then show interest in some of the Gaillard’s programming, she said.

“It’s a great way to bring the community into these art locations,” Oubré said. “The community needs to be part of the story.”

Sterling deVries, the Gaillard Center’s director of education, said her organization is working with the Anson Street African Burial Ground Project to create educational materials for patrons, residents and the 10,000 students who visit the Gaillard each year.

A looping information video, positioned in the lobby, will feature interviews with people involved in the project, such as Oubré and Gilmore.

And the Gaillard will focus on the burial grounds in various education and community programs, including its “Raising the Volume” series hosted by Charlton Singleton and Marcus Amaker as well as its Arts Literacy Pilot Program for middle and high school students, which supplements regular texts and lesson with information about the arts.

All of this is to spur honest and direct conversations about Charleston’s history of slavery and discrimination, deVries said.

“We’re just here to support them,” she said of the burial project leaders. “We can’t take ownership of that space, but we want to take responsibility for it.”

For many African Americans who remember the Ansonborough neighborhood of the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s, when it was predominantly Black, the Gaillard Center is a symbol of discrimination and displacement. Around 100 homes occupied by African Americans were demolished in the mid-1960s to make way for the original Gaillard Municipal Auditorium and nearby structures. Gaillard staff are aware of this history, deVries said. Yet they are committed to inclusiveness and community outreach.

That’s why the Gaillard hosted the Denmark Vesey Bicentenary commemoration, partnering with the International African American Museum and Emanuel AME Church. That’s why its website includes this statement: “The Gaillard Center is committed to elevating local and regional voices and partnering with Charleston institutions to reflect the city’s diversity, both on stage and off.” That’s why it seeks to foster “essential dialogue” through its education initiatives.

“When it comes down to it, our institution is for the community, but only a few feel welcome,” deVries said. “We’re trying to change that.”

Lauderback said she hopes the new memorial will draw attention to more than the Anson Street burial ground. The city has many other known and unknown Black graveyards.

“This can represent so many whose stories have never been told,” she said. “It’s important ... to celebrate the people on whose backs the city was built. To have so many unmarked graves and mass graves is part of the history that we don’t love, but we need to bring attention to the truth.” Telling the truth about the past, one project at a time, is how we move forward, she said. “That’s the way you heal, that’s the way you become better.”

Once the memorial is finished, it will become the property of the city.

Tecklenburg said the city is coordinating with the International African American Museum to direct visitors to notable sites of African American history, including the Anson Street memorial, and perhaps to develop a walking tour. For those who embark on a self-guided tour, materials online and in print could soon be available, he said.

The number of sites is growing, he noted. They include the new museum and its outdoor space; Emanuel AME Church and its future memorial to the victims of the 2015 mass shooting; the Susie Jackson Freedom Memorial Garden at the Charleston County Public Library; the old Charleston Work House; the Old Slave Mart Museum; the Robert Smalls historical marker on East Battery; the former Kress building on King Street, which was the site of a 1960 sit-in; the Denmark Vesey statue in Hampton Park; and various cemeteries and burial grounds, such as the one on Heriot Street, that are part of a preservation effort now underway.

The city also hopes to promote minority-owned businesses on the Charleston peninsula, Tecklenburg said. Not many of those are left.

Hayes, who is an art professor at Duke University, and who in 2020 won the Gibbes Museum’s 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art, has designed other memorials, including one called “Boundless,” a monument to the U.S. Colored Troops who fought in the Civil War. The installation features 11 life-sized figures and is located at the Cameron Art Museum — which sits on the site of the 1865 Battle of Forks Road in Wilmington, N.C.

Hayes said he found descendants of the soldiers and Civil War reenactors to serve as models.

“I like to use the body — people — as part of the work,” he said. “It brings in the past with the present, and also the future.”

The children and grandchildren of these models can visit the memorial years from now and see something of their own lives in the work.

Thus the generations are connected by history, and by art.

Preparing for Hurricane Nicole in Charleston, SC

Note: By the time this newsletter hits your inbox on Thursday morning at 6 a.m., the storm’s status may have changed. Check here for live updates.This isn’t our first go-around this hurricane season, but you can never be too prepared. Here’s what we know so far about Hurricane Nicole and how you can stay informed and ready.As of 6 p....

Note: By the time this newsletter hits your inbox on Thursday morning at 6 a.m., the storms status may have changed. Check here for live updates.

This isn’t our first go-around this hurricane season, but you can never be too prepared. Here’s what we know so far about Hurricane Nicole and how you can stay informed and ready.

As of 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 9, Nicole had strengthened to a hurricane with maximum sustained wind speeds of 75 miles per hour. At this time, a Tropical Storm Warning and Storm Surge Watch were in effect for parts of the Lowcountry including Charleston County.

The storm’s greatest local impacts were expected to be felt on Thursday lasting into Friday. Prepare for possible coastal flooding, tornadoes, beach erosion, dangerous surf and rip currents, tropical-storm-force winds, and heavy rainfall.

Rainfall | Charleston County could see between 2-4 inches of rain. Check TIDEeye for tidal flooding reports.

Gas | Wondering which gas stations are still open? Use this map from GasBuddy to find an open gas station near you.

Power outages | You can track or report power outages using Dominion Energy’s online map. You can also check Electric Cooperatives of South Carolina’s outage map.

Road closures | Use the City of Charleston’s GIS map to track potential road closures.

Stay informed | Follow Nicoles path here. Stay up-to-date with the SC Emergency Management Division here, keep an eye out for a City of Charleston news flash, and sign up for Charleston County alerts.

Pets | This article wraps up a few tips to keep your furry friends safe whether you’re hunkering down at home or heading to a shelter.

Hurricane kits | Restock your hurricane kit with supplies from this list.

Additional resources | Go here for resources including emergency phone numbers and maps.

No damage reported as Nicole blows through South Carolina as tropical depression

COLUMBIA — South Carolina went largely unscathed as severe tropical weather from Nicole moved across and then out of the state over two days.Tornado warnings spawned around the Midlands early Nov. 11, but no damage, beyond downed tree branches, had been reported to state emergency response personnel. Watches in the Pee Dee region throughout the morning ended without detecting any tornadic activity, though high winds and scattered rain showers held on until the evening. No storm-related injuries were reported.Power outages...

COLUMBIA — South Carolina went largely unscathed as severe tropical weather from Nicole moved across and then out of the state over two days.

Tornado warnings spawned around the Midlands early Nov. 11, but no damage, beyond downed tree branches, had been reported to state emergency response personnel. Watches in the Pee Dee region throughout the morning ended without detecting any tornadic activity, though high winds and scattered rain showers held on until the evening. No storm-related injuries were reported.

Power outages were minimal, with a peak of 3,400 outages reported statewide, according to state Emergency Management Division spokesman Derrec Becker.

There also was some coastal flooding Nov. 10, including near Pamleys Creek in Pawleys Island where sand dunes were damaged by Hurricane Ian.

“Other than that, it was (a) few limbs here and there, nothing of any significance,” Georgetown County Emergency Services Director Brandon Ellis said. “We were very fortunate.”

Nicole, which made landfall in Florida as a hurricane, had been downgraded from a tropical storm to a depression around 10 p.m. Nov. 10. Charleston saw a daily record of 1.36 inches of rain, which mostly cleared overnight with a steady wind continuing Nov. 11, according to the National Weather Service.

The storm dropped 1.54 inches of rain on Columbia as of 4 p.m. Nov. 11, the NWS reported. Wind gusts of 37 mph were recorded throughout the afternoon.

Temporary flooding was reported at 4 a.m. on Interstate 26 near Ballentine, lasting about two hours and clearing before most commuters were on the road, according to social media postings by the S.C. Department of Transportation.

Out of an abundance of caution, schools across the Midlands and Charleston County announced a day earlier they would hold remote-learning days Nov. 11.

The Upstate woke up to anywhere from a half-inch to 1½ inches of rain, with roughly the same amount falling over the course of the day, according to Weather Service meteorologist Clay Chaney.

The rare November hurricane had made landfall in southeastern Florida on Nov. 10 as a Category 1, causing flooding and coastal erosion. It gradually weakened as it crossed central Florida and moved into Georgia and South Carolina, according to the National Hurricane Center.

In Horry County, early morning gray skies quickly turned sunny, leaving little trace that a storm passed by the area hours before.

Beachgoers in Garden City were taking in warmer-than-average temperatures, with some surfing and others walking their dogs. At the nearby pier off of Atlantic Avenue, people were casting fishing lines, hoping to snag dinner.

The Horry County School District opened on a regular schedule, with many schools holding Veterans Day events.

Storm surge and rainfall flooded parts of the Charleston area Nov. 10. Heavier rain began to fall late that morning, coupling with the high tide to cause flooding in low-lying areas of the Lowcountry.

Richard Caines, Mike Woodel and Caitlin Herrington contributed to this report.

UNC vs. College of Charleston (2022): How to Watch, Cord-Cutting Options and Tip-Off Time

The No. 1 UNC men’s basketball team will be back in action Friday night, when the Tar Heels host College of Charleston in the Smith Center. This is the third consecutive season the Tar Heels will have faced the Cougars, with Carolina winning the previous two.If you aren’t making it to the Smith Center for the game, here’s how to follow along at home:Broadcast ScheduleThose hoping to listen on the radio with Jones Angell on the call can do so at ...

The No. 1 UNC men’s basketball team will be back in action Friday night, when the Tar Heels host College of Charleston in the Smith Center. This is the third consecutive season the Tar Heels will have faced the Cougars, with Carolina winning the previous two.

If you aren’t making it to the Smith Center for the game, here’s how to follow along at home:

Broadcast Schedule

Those hoping to listen on the radio with Jones Angell on the call can do so at 97.9 FM and 1360 AM, or by streaming the radio broadcast on Chapelboro.com.

97.9 The Hill’s radio coverage of the game will begin at 5:30 p.m. with Countdown to Tip-Off With Brighton McConnell.

At 6 p.m., the broadcast will shift over to Jones Angell and the Tar Heel Sports Network for their pregame coverage until tip-off. They will also carry postgame coverage for approximately an hour after the conclusion of the game.

Per NCAA broadcast restrictions, the stream is turned off for all NCAA Tournament games, meaning you can only access the radio broadcast of NCAA games on and AM/FM radio. For regular season and ACC Tournament game broadcasts, you can access the stream (computer, tablet or phone) through Chapelboro.com, TuneIN or most streaming apps, but you must be within 75-miles of Chapel Hill and have your location services for your device turned on. This applies to Hubert Davis Live but does not apply to Countdown to Tip-Off with Brighton McConnell, which you can stream from anywhere in the world 90 minutes before tip-off! If you live more than 75 miles outside of Chapel Hill, you can access the Tar Heel Sports Network game broadcast stream through the Varsity Network.

For more information about WCHL’s sports programming, click here.

TV Schedule

Television coverage of the game begins at 7 p.m. The game will be broadcast on the ACC’s Regional Sports Network partners, which for North Carolina is Bally Sports South, formerly known as Fox Sports South. For more information, click here.

What if I don’t have cable?

Those within the regional market can stream the game online at ballysports.com. Those outside the market who wish to stream the game can do so on the Watch ESPN app or online here. Both in-market and out-of-market consumers must enter their TV provider to gain access to the stream.

Bally Sports+ is Bally’s streaming service. It costs $20/month, but can be used on a seven-day free trial.

DirecTV STREAM also carries Bally Sports. The service starts at $69.99 per month.

Featured image via Todd Melet

Chapelboro.com does not charge subscription fees, and you can directly support our efforts in local journalism here. Want more of what you see on Chapelboro? Let us bring free local news and community information to you by signing up for our biweekly newsletter.

North Carolina vs. College of Charleston: How to watch live stream, TV channel, NCAAB start time

College of Charleston @ No. 1 North CarolinaCurrent Records: College of Charleston 1-0; North Carolina 1-0The College of Charleston Cougars have quite the challenge ahead of them as they're expected to be blown off the court. They will take on the #1 North Carolina Tar Heels at 7 p.m. ET Friday at Dean E. Smith Center. These two teams come into the game bolstered by wins in their previous games.The Cougars were able to grind out a solid win over the Chattanooga Mocs on Monday, winning 85-78.Meanwhile, UNC had enou...

College of Charleston @ No. 1 North Carolina

Current Records: College of Charleston 1-0; North Carolina 1-0

The College of Charleston Cougars have quite the challenge ahead of them as they're expected to be blown off the court. They will take on the #1 North Carolina Tar Heels at 7 p.m. ET Friday at Dean E. Smith Center. These two teams come into the game bolstered by wins in their previous games.

The Cougars were able to grind out a solid win over the Chattanooga Mocs on Monday, winning 85-78.

Meanwhile, UNC had enough points to win and then some against the UNC-Wilmington Seahawks on Monday, taking their contest 69-56. The top scorers for UNC were RJ Davis (17 points), Caleb Love (17 points), and Armando Bacot (16 points).

The wins brought College of Charleston up to 1-0 and UNC to 1-0. A pair of last-season defensive stats to keep an eye on: College of Charleston has allowed their opponents to shoot 49.20% from the floor on average, which is the 40th highest shooting percentage allowed in college basketball. On the other hand, the Tar Heels have been holding their opponents to a field goal percentage of 29.30%, which places them 24th in college basketball. So the cards are definitely stacked in their favor.

The Tar Heels are a big 22-point favorite against the Cougars, according to the latest college basketball odds.

The oddsmakers were right in line with the betting community on this one, as the game opened as a 22-point spread, and stayed right there.

Over/Under: -110

See college basketball picks for every single game, including this one, from SportsLine's advanced computer model. Get picks now.

North Carolina have won both of the games they've played against College of Charleston in the last eight years.

Watch Now:

After an underwhelming opening week for college basketball featuring few marquee matchups, in-season tournaments are approaching to add some punch to the November slate. These bracketed events are on the horizon across the country -- and overseas -- that will feature quality programs battling it out with each other for early-season resume-building victories.

While much of the sports world remains locked in on football season, this portion of the college basketball calendar can fly under the national radar. But it produces results and insights that will be relevant when conference play rolls around and NCAA Tournament credentials are under evaluation.

Take the performance of Johnny Davis and Wisconsin in last year's Maui Invitational as an example. The Badgers' guard emerged by averaging 23.7 points, 6.7 rebounds and 2.3 steals during Wisconsin's three-game championship run that featured wins over Texas A&M, Houston and Saint Mary's.

The sophomore guard had merely been a role player as a freshman, but the Maui Invitational offered the first big clue that he would become a first-round NBA Draft pick who would lead the Badgers to a share of the Big Ten regular season title and a No. 3 seed in the NCAA Tournament. As we prepare for the 2022 in-season tournaments, there are guaranteed to be similar individual and team breakout performances.

Here is a ranking of the best early-season, bracket-style events in college basketball.

1. Maui Invitational

2. Continental Tire Main Event

3. Battle 4 Atlantis

4. Phil Knight Invitational

5. Phil Knight Legacy

6. ESPN Events Invitational

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