Pressure Washingin James Island, SC

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Power Wash James Island, SC

James Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like James Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean James Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in James Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in James Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in James Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in James Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
James Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean James Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in James Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

 Power Washer James Island, SC

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in James Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in James Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

 Pressure Wash James Island, SC

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in James Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in James Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean James Island, we work with business owners across James Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in James Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

 Pressure Washer James Island, SC

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in James Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

 Best Pressure Washer James Island, SC

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean James Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in James Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in James Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in James Island, SC

St. James Episcopal Church returns back to Episcopalian roots after 10 years

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — In August, the South Carolina Supreme Court ruled eight Anglican Churches have to return back to the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.Back in 2012, 29 parishes left the Episcopal Church due to acceptance of same sex marriage. However, the South Carolina Supreme Court ruled some of those c...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — In August, the South Carolina Supreme Court ruled eight Anglican Churches have to return back to the Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina.

Back in 2012, 29 parishes left the Episcopal Church due to acceptance of same sex marriage. However, the South Carolina Supreme Court ruled some of those churches did not have proper ownership based on State Trust Law.

One of those churches is Saint James Episcopal Church on James Island. On Sunday, the church held its first Episcopalian service in a decade.

“There was a schism in the Episcopal church in 2012 and at that point this church affiliated itself with the Anglican Church and the South Carolina Supreme Court recently decided that legally this church still belonged to the episcopal church," said Rev. Taylor Smith the newly installed Priest in Charge for Saint James Episcopal Church.

“This church has been affiliated with what would be the Episcopal church for 300 years, so it was gone for 10 years, but it’s now coming home," Smith continued.

This also opened the door to new beginnings.

“I don’t know the people who are going to be here, it’s going to be a brand-new congregation. The Episcopalians and the Anglicans who are staying, I don’t know many of them, so this is really a brand new thing," Smith said.

Rev. Taylor Smith is a lifelong Episcopalian and he embraces the changes.

“We welcome everyone, and that’s been an issue sometime in the last ten years, but we are open and welcoming to all comers, and that’s really important to who we are," Smith said.

And whether Anglican or Episcopalian, the hope is that faith will bring them together.

“But we are now the people of this church and I hope everyone who worshipped here when it was an Anglican Church will come back. That will be a deep hope of mine, I don’t know if they will, that’s up to them. We can’t force anyone to worship anywhere but we’ll welcome everyone," Smith said.

Service will be held every Sunday at 8 and 10 a.m. at 1872 Camp Road on James Island.

Top-ranked Stratford girls head into region play on win streak

Kelly McNeil flung open the locker room door and felt like spitting nails.But the Stratford girls basketball coach didn’t have to say a whole lot after her team’s 38-35 loss at James Island last month. A key injury and foul trouble on the road doomed the No. 5 team in Class AAAAA in their first loss of the regular season.“I didn’t say a word,” McNeil said. “They said they have no idea what’s going to happen to them the next time they see us. Things have become very personal for them. Th...

Kelly McNeil flung open the locker room door and felt like spitting nails.

But the Stratford girls basketball coach didn’t have to say a whole lot after her team’s 38-35 loss at James Island last month. A key injury and foul trouble on the road doomed the No. 5 team in Class AAAAA in their first loss of the regular season.

“I didn’t say a word,” McNeil said. “They said they have no idea what’s going to happen to them the next time they see us. Things have become very personal for them. That’s something I’ve been trying to ingrain in them since I got here.”

The upset loss sparked a turnaround and Stratford hasn’t tasted defeat since, also rising to No. 1 in the most recent Class AAAAA poll by the South Carolina Basketball Coaches Association.

A victory Jan. 3 at West Ashley was the eighth straight for McNeil’s bunch, a stretch that includes a 24-point victory against James Island Dec. 20. Stratford also swept three games in three days at home to win a Carolina Invitational division Dec. 28-30.

The Knights knocked off Augusta Christian (54-14), University WVa. (48-45) and Forbush N.C. (39-23) in the annual event to continue building momentum for the most important part of the season.

Senior guard Yasmine Cook and sophomore guard Ciara Mustapher pace the Knights on the scoreboard, averaging 14.7 and 10.6 points. Senior guard Kaleyia Brown and senior forward Ta’Liya Griffin chip in better than seven points a game. Senior point guard Kiki Prudhomme adds 6.5 points a contest while leading the way in steals and assists. Cook tracks down a team-high 5.1 boards a game.

Mustapher knocked down six shots from beyond the arc against Augusta Christian, pouring in a season-high 23 points. More of that takes Stratford to a whole new level on the offensive end of the floor.

“She’s very quiet and subdued but when she starts hitting them like that she’s begging for the ball,” McNeil said of the lone underclassman who starts. “It relieves Yasmine a little bit. Most people are worried about her when we come in. Ciara gets lost in that. Now, they’ve got to come out on her. We like to press out of a make anyway so when she’s firing them up like that, it just gets us going off our press. With Kiki and Yasmine’s long arms, we can get layup after layup.”

Prudhomme almost had a triple-double before Christmas.

“If she has a stretch of games like that where she scores 14 points, 16 points or 18 points, that’s pretty remarkable,” McNeil said. “She likes to give up the ball but our press generates points for her. It’s a lot like Ciara. If she’s going off scoring, you can bet somebody else is too. It rallies us up and gets us hungry.”

Next up is the Region 6-AAAAA slate for the 13-1 Knights. The curtain will be pulled back Jan. 13 at defending league champion Cane Bay, which swept Stratford last winter.

“Everything we’ve done up until now is about fixing things before region starts,” McNeil said. “Now, it’s here. Region is what matters. Hopefully, they’re buying into that part. I know they’re still burning from last year (losing to Cane Bay twice). It was a hyped up thing and we didn’t play well.”

The Cobras are powered by Charleston Southern signee Alaina Nettles, one of the top seniors in the state. She exited Christmas break averaging 19 points, 8.9 rebounds, 6.3 steals and 3.8 assists. Last season, Nettles torched the Knights for 28 and 20 points in a pair of victories by 22 and 15 points.

“Mathematically in my head, she brings anywhere from 25 to 28 points,” McNeil said. “Even on a tough night for her, she’s still 15 to 18 points. We need to force their other players to consistently score.”

Stratford will enter the showdown not having played a game in nine days. Cane Bay, meanwhile, will have seen action three more times (Jan. 4, 6 and 10).

“I don’t know if that is going to help us or hurt us,” McNeil said. “Cane Bay always has an answer for us. It doesn’t matter what’s at stake. They always play us tough. It’s developed more into an understood rivalry. I’m always expecting Alaina to do what Alaina does and hopefully we have an answer for her. Hopefully, we’re able to play well.”

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Mayor: 2 illegal stop signs cause confusion, controversy in James Island neighborhood

Two fake stop signs have been found in one James Island neighborhood, which the mayor says has caused confusion and controversy between town officials and localJAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Two fake stop signs have been found in one James Island neighborhood, which the mayor says has caused confusion and controversy between town officials and locals.A neighbor’s security camera captured the Town of James Island’s public works department removing the illegal stop signs from the corner of Clearview Drive and Tennant Str...

Two fake stop signs have been found in one James Island neighborhood, which the mayor says has caused confusion and controversy between town officials and local

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - Two fake stop signs have been found in one James Island neighborhood, which the mayor says has caused confusion and controversy between town officials and locals.

A neighbor’s security camera captured the Town of James Island’s public works department removing the illegal stop signs from the corner of Clearview Drive and Tennant Street on Oct. 21.

“You cannot put your own stop signs out. You can always come to the town and make a request, and it will always be merited,” Mayor Bill Woolsey said. “We won’t often be able to put them up, but you can’t put them up yourself, and how we respond is we immediately contact SCDOT. We would have been very surprised if they put a stop sign out there without telling us beforehand.”

A worker could be seen wiggling one of the signs a couple of times before lifting it out of the ground and placing it in the back of a truck.

Not only were the signs put in illegally, according to the Charleston County Sheriff’s Office, but the ground next to the street was painted with white stop bars, as well.

“It’s the first I’ve ever heard about it, and I hope it doesn’t spread,” Woolsey said. “[I’m surprised] someone would come and paint a line in the road and buy some online stop signs and install them themselves in the middle of the night or early in the morning.”

Deputies said they were patrolling the area the night before and didn’t see any new signs, but when they went back the next day, they said the signs, which were apparently purchased online, had been put in overnight.

The South Carolina Department of Transportation has also confirmed they have not installed any stop signs at the intersection.

Neighbors initially thought the stop signs were put in by DOT to help with speeders and said the fake signs hurts their ability to address the issue.

“I guess somebody duped us, and they were putting in fake stop signs,” neighbor Jim Boyd said. “They looked to all of us legitimate and 100% real. We are just in favor of anything and everything that we can get people to slow down. Yes, we understand first responders need to get here quickly as well, but we want everything and anything.”

However, Woolsey said he believes the signs did not pop up at random.

“If we find out who did it, they will be charged, and we believe that, most likely, it was someone who lives close by,” he said.

Woolsey also said there was a recent incident where an illegal speed bump was found and removed near the intersection. He said the speed bump had black and yellow stripes and was similar to one found in parking lots across the Lowcountry.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

Cost to extend I-526 to James Island more than triples to $2.35 billion

The price tag for the Mark Clark Extension linking West Ashley to Johns and James islands has more than tripled to $2.35 billion and Charleston County would be responsible for most of the bill.Some opponents are saying the excessive new cost figure for the final loop of the Interstate 526 system shows the route has gotten too expensive and should be dropped.“It is time to say enough is enough,” said Jason Crowley of the Coastal Conservation League. “This to me is a perfect opportunity for Charleston County Cou...

The price tag for the Mark Clark Extension linking West Ashley to Johns and James islands has more than tripled to $2.35 billion and Charleston County would be responsible for most of the bill.

Some opponents are saying the excessive new cost figure for the final loop of the Interstate 526 system shows the route has gotten too expensive and should be dropped.

“It is time to say enough is enough,” said Jason Crowley of the Coastal Conservation League. “This to me is a perfect opportunity for Charleston County Council to walk away from this project.”

The S.C. Department of Transportation is asking the county to agree on moving forward, but with the local share of the project pegged at more than $1.9 billion it’s not clear where Charleston County would get the money.

Also favoring the completion is the Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce, which sees rising expenses as a reason to get it done as soon as possible, and the city of Charleston.

“No question, the cost estimates for major infrastructure projects in South Carolina are exploding, and (Interstate) 526 is no exception,” Mayor John Tecklenburg said in a prepared statement. “But that doesn’t change the fact that our West Ashley and Island residents need and deserve the traffic relief and public safety improvements this project will bring.”

The connection between Interstate 526 and the James Island Connector, aimed at easing traffic on and off Johns Island, has been debated for decades and growing more costly all the time.

The DOT’s new cost estimate is more than three times the $725 million price calculated in 2015, but all of the increase would fall to Charleston County because the state’s share of the cost was capped at $420 million in a 2019 agreement with the county.

Charleston County had expected to contribute about $305 million, not more than six times that amount.

“We’ll wait to see how the county responds,” said state Secretary of Transportation Christy Hall. “Our recommendation remains ... to proceed with preliminary activity on the project and get to the point where it would be shovel-ready.”

In a letter to the county April 25, Hall said DOT is asking the county and the state Transportation Infrastructure Bank Board for approval to spend $150 million for ongoing work to make the road plan ready for bids. The county would pay half that amount.

Beyond that, the highway department wants the county to demonstrate “a reasonable financial approach to the entire project.”

“I don’t know if people are going to have an appetite for it,” said County Council Chairman Teddie Pryor. “Where are we going to get the extra money from?”

County Council was expected to discuss the issue at its April 26 meeting, but instead Pryor announced that Hall would be attending the council’s Finance Committee meeting on May 5. No member of council mentioned the road project or the new cost estimate at the meeting, but several members of the audience did.

“My personal opinion is, we should just cut our losses and not spend another dime on the project,” said Linda Miller of Johns Island.

Supporters and opponents of the road plan have expressed shock over the new cost estimate. Bradley Taggart, a co-founder of Charlestonians For I-526, told County Council members that a temporary spike in commodity prices was likely to blame and could prove temporary.

“We could be looking at a project that costs half as much in six month’s time as the market rebalances,” he told council members.

The county and the state have each spent about $12.5 million on the project so far, Pryor said earlier in the day.

“The longer this thing is delayed, the more it’s going to cost,” said Pryor.

Hall said one reason the cost has gone up so much is the soaring price of real estate in Charleston County. Acquiring the land needed for the road would cost an estimated $261 million, she said.

The DOT estimate assumes construction could begin in 2028, and also assumes there would be two or three years of litigation before that.

A legal challenge to the project has been winding its way through the courts for years already, with the Coastal Conservation League fighting Charleston County’s 2019 agreement to pay all the costs exceeding $420 million.

Crowley, CCL’s communities and transportation senior program director, suggested the new cost estimate could open the door to negotiating a way out of the contract were the county to seek an exit.

The county is currently spending about $200 million improving Johns Island roads, the Limehouse bridge over the Stono River and the intersection of U.S. Highway 17 and Main Road.

The Coastal Conservation League has strongly opposed the I-526 extension, calling it in 2021 “a last-century highway project that benefits few and impacts many.” A community organization called Nix 526 has also been fighting the project, and Charleston Waterkeeper and the S.C. Wildlife Federation have raised objections.

Supporters of the proposed roadway include the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors and the Trident CEO Council, the city of Charleston, Charlestonians For I-526, and many residents of Kiawah Island.

“The new cost estimate is a direct result of what happens when a critical project is continually delayed, costs inevitably go up,” said the Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce. “The current cost of the project heightens the important need of completing this effort now.”

While Crowley said it’s time to say “enough is enough” the Chamber said “Now is the time to double down on our efforts” in a statement April 26.

Johns Island residents have been divided on the project, which would make it easier to get on and off the island but could increase development there. The island’s population has been growing quickly and many new residential subdivisions are underway.

Charleston governs a large part of Johns Island and has long supported the road project. City Council on April 26 unanimously adopted a resolution urging the county to continue moving forward.

If the extension were completed, there would be a highway loop around Charleston, with the interstate running from Mount Pleasant across Daniel Island, North Charleston and West Ashley, then becoming more of a low-speed parkway across Johns Island and connecting to the James Island Connector on James Island.

While the project would extend from the end of I-526 in West Ashley, DOT calls it the Mark Clark Extension. It’s separate from ongoing plans to widen the existing parts of the interstate from West Ashley to Mount Pleasant.

James Island couple claims they’re out thousands after contractor never did work

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A couple on James Island thought they were well on their way to renovating their back deck after hiring a Lowcountry contractor. But after the contractor took their money, they say the work never got done.Don Geddes and his wife have lived on James Island for more than two decades. They recently revamped their front steps and in September of last year decided they wanted to pull the trigger on renovating their back deck as well. They wanted a certain material and Geddes says Travis Tardiff of Tardiff Builde...

JAMES ISLAND, S.C. (WCSC) - A couple on James Island thought they were well on their way to renovating their back deck after hiring a Lowcountry contractor. But after the contractor took their money, they say the work never got done.

Don Geddes and his wife have lived on James Island for more than two decades. They recently revamped their front steps and in September of last year decided they wanted to pull the trigger on renovating their back deck as well. They wanted a certain material and Geddes says Travis Tardiff of Tardiff Builders initially came recommended by the company that makes the material.

“The deposit was 50 percent of the job,” Geddes says. “The job was $15,000 and we wrote him a check for $7,500. And that’s the last time I saw him.”

Geddes says Tardiff started out by emailing them updates.

“I wrote him that check in September,” Geddes says. “We would get emails that told us where we were in the process. He said some of the material had come in, and then he said the material had come in but not the railing.”

The last email though came in March when Geddes says Tardiff dissolved the contract.

“He said the money orders are in the mail – but we never got that,” Geddes says.

Geddes also found, out after the fact, that Tardiff’s contracting license with the state expired months before even taking on the job.

Attempts to reach Tardiff through multiple forms failed. The email account listed was not accurate and bounced back. Some of the phone numbers listed were out of service. One phone number made it to voicemail, but it was full. The address for the business listed is now occupied by another company.

At this point, Geddes has filed a complaint with the Better Business Bureau and says his next step is to take the matter to small claims court.

“We also need some kind of emotional closure to this – because it was a violation in a way for us,” Geddes says. “But doing the interviews with the new people are more exciting because I’m going to be counting on these people to do the work they promised to do.”

If you are in a similar situation, you should contact the S.C. Department of Consumer Affairs and the Better Business Bureau.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. All rights reserved.

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