Pressure Washingin Kiawah Island, SC

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Power Wash Kiawah Island, SC

Kiawah Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Kiawah Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Kiawah Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Kiawah Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Kiawah Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Kiawah Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Kiawah Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Kiawah Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Kiawah Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Kiawah Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

 Power Washer Kiawah Island, SC

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Kiawah Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Kiawah Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

 Pressure Wash Kiawah Island, SC

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Kiawah Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Kiawah Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Kiawah Island, we work with business owners across Kiawah Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Kiawah Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

 Pressure Washer Kiawah Island, SC

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Kiawah Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

 Best Pressure Washer Kiawah Island, SC

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Kiawah Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Kiawah Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Kiawah Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Kiawah Island, SC

Kiawah to the NHL: Lowcountry hockey star hoping to blaze trail with top-level aspirations

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — From the frozen ponds of Kiawah Island?There are many routes to pro hockey. Most run through Montreal, Moscow, Lower Ontario, or Upper Alberta.They typically do not run through or begin on Kiawah Island. Until now.The...

KIAWAH ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — From the frozen ponds of Kiawah Island?

There are many routes to pro hockey. Most run through Montreal, Moscow, Lower Ontario, or Upper Alberta.

They typically do not run through or begin on Kiawah Island. Until now.

The path between playing as a kid at North Charleston’s Ice Palace to signing a D1 scholarship with Clarkson University is an interesting one for Kiawah Island’s Jared Mangan. “Felt right for me, I loved prep school, and the town gave me that prep school feel. That small town, everyone in town is a Clarkson hockey fan, and top-of-the-line facilities, everything was really cool," said the 19-year-old, who is now playing for the Lincoln Stars in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Clarkson is a top D1 hockey program, which is Mangan's plan, but plans can always change.

“NHL draft would be pretty cool, kind of a longshot, but not really a longshot—depends on how this year goes because it’s my last year of eligibility to get drafted. But it’s always been a dream, but there are still lots of great players who went undrafted and on to the NHL. Whatever happens, I’m going to keep working hard.”

Hockey is a bit different than other sports. The goal for any top amateur is to play junior hockey on a team representing a town, typically far from home.

“I feel like it’s a job right now. You wake up, junior hockey is a dream. All you have to do is hockey, don’t have to worry about school- when I get to school, it’s going to be kind of hard getting back into studying and everything, right now, it’s pretty fun just playing hockey, and being with the guys.”

Quite a bit of forethought went into the decision to play hockey at the next level. He left home at 13 years old and went to a prep school in upstate NY. He played junior hockey in Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Nebraska.

“I was playing for Junior Stingrays, playing pretty good and scoring a lot of goals, dad thought it would be good to move north to see better competition, kept on progressing, and now I’m here. We get pretty good crowds, they don’t have much hockey- this is their pro team in Lincoln, NE, so we get pretty good crowds. I’ve kind of gotten used to I once you do it for so long—I’ve been away from home for so long at prep school, juniors, Buffalo—I’ve gotten used to it, but it’s what you’ve got to do to progress to the next level.”

It’s been one heck of a ride already. Wherever it goes, he’ll be blazing a path from Charleston’s Barrier Islands.

King's Corner: Kiawah - The land of deer, flounder and chess in unusual places

This past weekend, I spent time at the beautiful Kiawah Island in South Carolina, where a friend of mine was having his wedding.The island is beyond quiet. It is actually eerie how quiet it is out there, with their beautiful homes and golf courses.Furthermore, the wildlife there is astounding, as the deer – aplenty on Kiawah – have become so people-friendly that they get right up next to you. And the flounder are as beautiful as they are elusive.The AirBnB my friends and I stayed in was right on the golf cour...

This past weekend, I spent time at the beautiful Kiawah Island in South Carolina, where a friend of mine was having his wedding.

The island is beyond quiet. It is actually eerie how quiet it is out there, with their beautiful homes and golf courses.

Furthermore, the wildlife there is astounding, as the deer – aplenty on Kiawah – have become so people-friendly that they get right up next to you. And the flounder are as beautiful as they are elusive.

The AirBnB my friends and I stayed in was right on the golf course and within view of plenty of water. So, I turned it into a chess opportunity for the next battle of wits against a brand new opponent.

My worthy adversary this go-round was my longtime friend, Ben, now living in San Francisco but back on the east coast for the wedding.

Ben and I, along with three of our friends, made our way to the golf course near where the sun was setting; all the golfers were already in front of us on their round. We set up shop for an afternoon of fishing and chess.

What happened next was a series of fortunate events, as strokes of good luck continued to fall on us.

It began with the battle of wits, with Ben and I setting up next to the bridge separating golf holes and bodies of water.

Thanks to a series of solid moves on my end, I had Ben pinned back early. Due to this advantage, I was able to press my position and push Ben’s King to his bottom left corner of the board. I completed my well-played game with a checkmate, thanks to covering my queen on its king attack with a rook on the same rank.

Next, one of the aforementioned deer unafraid of humans made its approach to us, getting incredibly close. While we captured the moment, the young, adolescent deer never ran away.

While the deer, whom I have hereby named Henry, chilled with us as we played chess and fished – one friend reeled in a beautiful flounder. This was the first of two flounder over our two days of fishing, and this one was not as evasive as his buddy was the following day, who escaped after being reeled halfway out the water and almost onto the dock.

Next, one of the locals approached with friendly intentions and brought her two trusty companions alongside her – two beautiful retrievers named Cooper and Riley. They were the goodest of dogs, and completed a truly epic 25 minutes of fortunate events.

While it may be some time before King’s Corner gets a setting like the one seen on the beautiful coast of South Carolina again, the column will continue to provide interesting locations to play the great game of chess.

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Adam Dodson is the head of sports for The News Courier and the writer of King's Column, a piece dedicated each week towards competing with local players, highlighting news in the Chess world and showcasing beautiful chess sets.

7 Things to Do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina

Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier ...

Follow winding, oak-shaded roads 25 miles southwest of downtown Charleston's cobblestone streets and celebrated restaurant scene, and you'll find yourself on Kiawah Island. Carved by the Kiawah River on one side and fronting the Atlantic Ocean on the other, the barrier island is a true escape. Here, nature reigns supreme: ten miles of beaches roll out along the Atlantic; cicadas form their own sort of soundtrack; and lights-out is often determined by the sea turtles' nesting season. Even so, there's plenty to do for travelers who like their time in nature punctuated with good food, luxurious creature comforts, and a frozen drink in hand. Here are seven things to do in Kiawah Island, South Carolina.

Stay Like a Local

For access to all of Kiawah's amenities, from bike rentals to pools, you'll have to stay on the island. For an experience that's luxurious but unpretentious, book a room at The Sanctuary, an oceanfront hotel known for its five-star service and elevated onsite dining. For families who want a little room to spread out (or a kitchen), villa and home rentals are a smart choice; reserve through the resort directly, or book through a site like VRBO or Airbnb.

Spend a Day on the Sand

On the west end of the island, Beachwalker Park is Kiawah's only public beach access feels like a hidden gem, thanks to its wide, unspoiled expanses of sand. It offers the best of both worlds too: in addition to the ocean frontage, you can also score views of the Kiawah River here.

Hit the Links

Five state-of-the-art golf courses are open to the public. For avid fans of the sport, the Ocean Course alone makes Kiawah worth the trip. Host to two PGA Championships, the 18-hole course is not for the faint of heart. Raised above the dunes to capitalize on the expansive shore views, golfers are also subjected to ocean breezes (which don't exactly make for an easy or predictable trip around the green). Try Cougar Point for marsh views and a slightly less technical experience.

Go for a Cruise

One of the best ways to explore the island is to leave the car in park and take a beach cruiser for a spin (you can reserve them through the resort or bring your own). Between 30 miles of paved trails and 10 miles of hard-packed beach, there's no shortage of routes to explore. Ask for directions to the Marsh View Tower, an observation deck primed for birdwatching and soaking in the marsh and river scenery.

Visit Heron Park Nature Center

The naturalists here will school you in many of the species who call the island home, from bobcats and white-tailed deer to loggerhead sea turtles and American alligators. Sign up for a guided tour, like "Back Island Birding", "Marsh Kayaking," or "Ocean Seining and Beach Combing," or ask for their recommendations for the best nature-spotting places in the area.

Explore Freshfields Village

Built around a lush lawn, Freshfields Village has plenty of restaurants and shops to explore, plus a boutique stay, the Andell Inn. Pick up a beach read at Indigo Books; snag treats for your four-legged friends at Dolitte's; and gear up for island adventures SeaCoast Sports and Outfitters. Start the morning with coffee and a breakfast sandwich from Java Java; settle in for grilled cheese and a milkshake at retro Vincent's Drugstore & Soda Fountain; or cap off the day with house-made frosé from newly opened The Co-Op. Check their calendar for seasonal events, like summertime's "Music on the Green" concert series and farmer's market.

Venture to Bohicket Marina & Market

Make the short drive to neighboring Seabrook Island for a taste of the area's salty maritime culture. Snag a umbrella-shaded table on the upper deck at Salty Dog Café for fresh catch, a cold beer, and riverfront views of the boats coming and going from the marina.

Kiawah Island real estate investment firm to build golf course on 885-acre Johns Is. tract

A real estate investment firm that owns the developer of Kiawah Island plans to build a private golf course on Johns Island and invest in new and existing resort and residential projects locally and across the Southeast after raising $225 million in a new fund.South Street Partners plans to turn the nearly 900-acre Orange Hill tract into an 18-hole golf course community with homes. It will include a short course and a practice facility for members of Kiawah Island Club. The property between Bohicket and River roads is now used as an o...

A real estate investment firm that owns the developer of Kiawah Island plans to build a private golf course on Johns Island and invest in new and existing resort and residential projects locally and across the Southeast after raising $225 million in a new fund.

South Street Partners plans to turn the nearly 900-acre Orange Hill tract into an 18-hole golf course community with homes. It will include a short course and a practice facility for members of Kiawah Island Club. The property between Bohicket and River roads is now used as an outdoor sporting site by the private club.

The land use allows for a golf course and associated amenities as well as residential development, said Chris Randolph, a South Street partner. He said plans are still evolving for the site, and it hasn’t been determined how many homes will be part of the Orange Hill development.

The golf course will take up about 300 acres.

Part of the property is in a planned unit development through Charleston County that allows 181 home sites, a golf course, clubhouse, pro shop, amenity center and about 212 acres of preserved land.

“We are working with the county and other constituents on Johns Island for a plan that everyone is happy with,” said Randolph, whose firm is headquartered in Charleston and Charlotte.

A representative of the Johns Island Community Association did not immediately respond to a request for comment about the proposed plan.

Randolph hopes to start development of the as-yet unnamed layout next year, followed by 12 to 18 months of construction. He also said it was too early to provide a cost estimate for the course, which will be one of the few to be built in South Carolina in recent years.

Randolph said the course would provide members with an additional golfing option and take some of the pressure off of the club’s two existing layouts, Cassique and the River Course, where usage has increased sharply during the pandemic. The average member played 40 more rounds in 2021 than in 2019, according to South Street.

“We think there is a new market of people who have recently moved to Charleston who would have an interest in joining a golf club like this given its proximity to the city and especially since it offers members access to the rest of the Kiawah Island Club amenities,” Randolph said.

The new course will be designed by Beau Welling of Greenville, who previously worked with River Course designer Tom Fazio. Welling also is a partner with Tiger Woods in the golfing great’s golf course design business.

The vision for the new course is to create a playing experience that looks like it could have been crafted more than 100 years ago, according to South Street. It will be built around grand live oaks and feature “undulating fairways ... and Old World slopes and contours.”

The company’s future plans for Kiawah include additional residential development as well as the opening of the oceanfront Cape Club adjacent to The Cape on Kiawah, a condominium development on the sea island’s western end. The Cape Club is expected to break ground in August.

South Street also recently acquired the 131-year-old Two Meeting Street Inn on the Charleston peninsula for nearly $7.7 million. It will be refurbished and become an overnight accommodation for Kiawah Island Club members when it reopens in 2023.

Randolph said raising the money for the golf course and other developments was challenging during the pandemic but the effort attracted “outsized investor demand” because of “compelling opportunities.”

South Street Partners’ other investments from the fund include the acquisition and development of the 20,000-acre Palmetto Bluff community in Bluffton near Hilton Head Island.

The company also has its sights set on other resort properties across the Southeast from south of Washington, D.C., to Florida and west to Texas.

“We are continuing to look for opportunities,” Randolph said.

Those could include existing properties or new developments.

South Street also owns The Cliffs communities across the mountains of South Carolina and North Carolina as well as The Residences at Salamander in Virginia.

Editorial: Our hopes and aspirations for South Carolina in the new year

Today, we turn the page on our calendars, looking ahead to a new year with clear-eyed concerns about the major challenges we face as a state and nation but an enduring belief that we will be able to rise to meet them.It’s an auspicious time to remember both of South Carolina’s mottos emblazoned on its state seal: The far lesser known “Animis Opibusque Parati” (Prepared in Mind and Resources) reminds us that we have the ability to make our state a better place to live and learn and work and play. And for those w...

Today, we turn the page on our calendars, looking ahead to a new year with clear-eyed concerns about the major challenges we face as a state and nation but an enduring belief that we will be able to rise to meet them.

It’s an auspicious time to remember both of South Carolina’s mottos emblazoned on its state seal: The far lesser known “Animis Opibusque Parati” (Prepared in Mind and Resources) reminds us that we have the ability to make our state a better place to live and learn and work and play. And for those who are dispirited by what they consider a lack of progress on those fronts, the better-known motto comes into play: “Dum Spiro Spero” (While I Breathe I Hope).

And so we do our best to bring both a prepared mind and a sense of optimism to outline progress we hope can be made on several significant challenges facing our state and our community. Our list is certainly not all-inclusive; indeed, we should never feel confident that we can predict all the new challenges that will arise in the coming year. Instead, as leaders and followers move past the holiday revelry and gradually return to work, we hope they will begin with a few overarching principles:

What we need most from our government at all levels — and from all of us — is more cooperation and less rigidity for the sake of rigidity. More moderation and less extremism. More transparency and less secrecy. More listening and less yelling, and tweeting. Yes, that might seem ridiculously utopian, and we don’t expect liberals and conservatives to suddenly agree on everything, but what we hope is that they will seek common ground rather than seeking to avoid it, that they will consider it a victory to get part of what they want, rather than insisting on 100%, that they will remember that even though they have different ideas about how to get there, most of them have the same goals for our state and community: a vibrant economy where everybody can get a good job and kids can get a good education and we’re all safe and healthy.

We’ll talk in much greater detail next Sunday about our hopes for the legislative session that begins on Jan. 10 — and as you can probably guess, it will focus in large part on improving the education we provide to the children of our state, protecting and preserving our natural resources, making wise use of our tax dollars and making government more open and accountable. But there’s plenty of good that can be accomplished at the state level without new laws.

For instance, we hope school districts will make wise decisions about how they spend their remaining COVID largesse from the federal government, which needs to be focused on catching up kids who fell behind during the pandemic, as well as kids who were already behind, and finding a way to translate that one-time money into permanent changes. Fortunately, there are several good models they can emulate; they just need to do that.

We hope new S.C. Education Superintendent Ellen Weaver will work with our school districts, not as an adversary, but neither as a pushover: as a helpful partner who insists on results.

We hope Attorney General Alan Wilson will step up an effort he seemed to start last year of pressuring school districts to comply with the state’s Freedom of Information Act — and expand that effort to local governments and state agencies; indeed, that would be far more useful than his involvement in partisan lawsuits — which his like-minded friends in other states can bring just fine without his help.

We hope the S.C. Supreme Court will continue and expand what appears to be a proactive effort, through its Office of Disciplinary Counsel, to identify problem judges before they become front-page exposes in The Post and Courier.

We hope our public colleges — and particularly USC and Clemson — will stop paying coaches to not coach. For that matter, we hope school districts will stop paying superintendents to not superintend, and then without even having the decency to tell us why they’re forced out. Should either group persist in this practice, we hope the Legislature will put a stop to it.

The most expensive infrastructure project in Charleston’s history will enter a critical phase in 2023, as the city and the Army Corps of Engineers enter into preliminary engineering and design for a perimeter wall. Both sides will figure out how a storm surge barrier would work, what it would look like and how the project would handle other types of flooding, to the extent that it would. The process likely will be made more lively because city voters will elect a mayor and six council members in November, but we hope significant progress will be made on an appealing, effective design most in the city will want to see built.

We also hope the city and other local governments make progress in changing their zoning and development rules to discourage building in lower-lying, more flood-prone areas — in part by eliminating slab-on-grade construction. The smarter we build today, the fewer headaches we will leave the future generations who will live and work in these buildings.

We hope for conservation efforts that will not only block misguided development but also preserve our scenic landscapes, wildlife habitat and unique sense of place. We hope to see victories on long-fought-over sites such as Captain Sams Spit on Kiawah Island and increasingly in Dorchester and Berkeley counties, which have new local financing for conservation work and growing development pressures.

We hope to see Charleston City Council approve a comprehensive rezoning for Union Pier that creates a vast, 30-acre public park along the Cooper River’s edge and extends the city’s urban grid and high-quality architecture into the remaining 40 acres on the west side of the site. The redevelopment debate will shed important light on who will pay for all the new public space and how. Similarly, we hope the city figures out a way to create a new urban park at 141 Meeting St., site of the old S.C. Electric & Gas office.

And we hope the city of North Charleston makes significant progress in redeveloping the waterfront area north of Noisette Creek, which is connected to Riverfront Park by a new pedestrian bridge. Congress opened an important door last month by allowing Joint Base Charleston to talk to the city about the future of that land.

While the new Lowcountry Rapid Transit bus line and the new Ashley River bike-ped bridge won’t open in 2023, we hope local officials can pick up the pace and move them much closer to completion.

Meanwhile, we hope that affordable housing projects in progress such as the Archer School renovation go smoothly, and we hope for significant breakthroughs that will lead to more investment in new homes, especially for workers struggling to find a place to live near their current jobs. Charleston County Council is expected to unveil its long-anticipated housing report within the month, and we hope it ignites new political momentum for the county to step up its leadership role in tackling our affordability challenge in a meaningful way.

Unrealistic? Perhaps. But not unachievable, because we are prepared in mind and resources, and while we breathe, we hope.

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