Pressure Washingin Knightsville, SC

Platform Lifts-phone-number 843-593-6815

Free Estimate

Our customer's satisfaction is our top priority

We appreciate you for choosing Palmetto Pressure Clean.

Power Wash Knightsville, SC

Knightsville is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Knightsville. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Knightsville comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Knightsville, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Knightsville are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Knightsville. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Knightsville. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Knightsville, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Knightsville, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Knightsville, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

 Power Washer Knightsville, SC

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Knightsville, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Knightsville, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

 Pressure Wash Knightsville, SC

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Knightsville, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Knightsville, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Knightsville, we work with business owners across Knightsville who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Knightsville, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

 Pressure Washer Knightsville, SC

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Knightsville, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

 Best Pressure Washer Knightsville, SC

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Knightsville, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Knightsville, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Knightsville? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

Free Consultation

Latest News in Knightsville, SC

Rescued primates living longer, happier lives at Summerville sanctuary

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – It was 1973 when Shirley McGreal, then living in Southeast Asia, saw beady bright eyes staring back at her from between the slats of a wooden crate.The eyes belonged to a gibbon — a primate native to the region — who had fallen victim to the dangerous world of the pet trade, where gibbons were being sold into homes, zoos, or labs, only to later be discarded.In 1977, McGreal created the Inter...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – It was 1973 when Shirley McGreal, then living in Southeast Asia, saw beady bright eyes staring back at her from between the slats of a wooden crate.

The eyes belonged to a gibbon — a primate native to the region — who had fallen victim to the dangerous world of the pet trade, where gibbons were being sold into homes, zoos, or labs, only to later be discarded.

In 1977, McGreal created the International Primate Protection League (IPPL) in Summerville as a gibbon sanctuary. The now 47-acre property remains nestled in a quiet area of the Lowcountry that is illuminated by the sounds of the primates singing to one another.

Meg McCue-Jones, the Compliance and Outreach Manager, explained that the land was a sod farm in the late 70s and started taking in the gibbons that needed help soon after.

One of the sanctuary’s residents, Gibby, is one of the oldest known living gibbons at over 60 years old.

Like most of the gibbons at the sanctuary, his life started off rough.

McCue-Jones said that Gibby was wild caught, and “with every gibbon wild caught, they shoot mom out of the tree, hoping baby falls, and then they take the baby.”

He was first sold into the pet trade in by a Bangkok dealer, but that was just the beginning. Gibby went to labs at Hofstra University and the State University at Stony Brook.

Researchers embedded electrodes in his skin as part of a locomotion project.

The electrodes and thin wires were inserted into his muscles and connected him to a suit that would measure his muscle movements. McCue-Jones explained that this was obviously not an ideal situation on any aspect, whether it be a human or animal.

At 44, Gibby made it to his first sanctuary, but the conditions were hard on his body. In March of 2007, just four years after his arrival, the IPPL reached out to the sanctuary to relocate not only Gibby, but several other gibbons.

For Gibby, like the other 29 at the sanctuary, Summerville is his last stop. McCue-Jones says that the sanctuary is their forever home.

But with the pandemic, their home has become more difficult to manage.

With fear of COVID-19 spreading to the primates, volunteers were no longer allowed to assist with the many daily tasks necessary to keep the place running.

From hosing the outsides of the enclosures, to raking, food prep, and even assistance inside the office—the staff was left with mounting responsibilities.

The economic impacts of the pandemic left donors and community partners reeling financially, but the bills at the sanctuary remained steady.

As a non-federally funded organization, the IPPL relies heavily on donations to meet the needs of the animals.

Stacy Lambert, a Senior Animal Care Giver, said that since a lot of their population has started to reach geriatric ages, their vet bills are getting bigger as they are having more interventions and medications, different procedures, and checkup appointments with Dr. John Ohlandt.

While expensive, their system of care has proven to work.

Lambert says that in the wild, gibbons usually live about 30-35 years. However, in captivity, gibbons living into their 40s is normal. However, the IPPL has quite a few gibbons that are up in their 40s and 50s while, of course, Gibby is 62.

Although the interventions from the IPPL show the ability of the sanctuary, McCue-Jones said all those at the IPPL ultimately wish there was not a need for them at all, and that the gibbons could live freely in the wild.

McCue-Jones said, “as Shirley has spoken of before, if you really think about it, do humans need sanctuaries, should we have them? Should we be treating the animals this way?”

To send the Gibbons a care package full of nuts, click here.

To donate to the IPPL’s missions and day-to-day operations, click here.

To send specified items needed by the IPPL via Amazon, click here.

FIRST ALERT: Tornado watch ends for much of the Lowcountry, watch still in effect for Georgetown, Williamsburg Co.

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC/AP) - A majority of tornado watches around the Lowcountry have been allowed to expire.Tornado watches are still in effect for Georgetown and Williamsburg Counties until 3 p.m. Friday.Bands of heavy rainfall continue to move onshore from the ocean with some gusty winds and lightning. These will continue overnight with isolated tornadoes also possible.A tornado warning was issued at 12:20 a.m., however it expired at 12:41 a.m.Nicol...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC/AP) - A majority of tornado watches around the Lowcountry have been allowed to expire.

Tornado watches are still in effect for Georgetown and Williamsburg Counties until 3 p.m. Friday.

Bands of heavy rainfall continue to move onshore from the ocean with some gusty winds and lightning. These will continue overnight with isolated tornadoes also possible.

A tornado warning was issued at 12:20 a.m., however it expired at 12:41 a.m.

Nicole has weakened to a tropical depression this evening, but a slight tornado risk continues for our area. Stay weather aware through the night! #chswx pic.twitter.com/Pxq4KCYNcM

— Stephanie (@stephaniesinewx) November 11, 2022

Earlier in the day, a tornado warning for Colleton and Dorchester Counties expired.

A severe thunderstorm capable of producing a tornado was located at 5:17 p.m. near Knightsville, moving northwest at 45 mph, according to the National Weather Service. The warning expired at 5:45 p.m.

A tropical storm warning expired for Charleston, Berkeley and coastal Colleton Counties Thursday afternoon. However, the waters off the coast from Jasper County to the Charleston-Georgetown line are still under a tropical storm warning.

SEVERE WEATHER THREAT// Storm Prediction Center issued a 2 out of 5 threat for severe weather tonight into early tomorrow morning. Main threat will be isolated tornadoes due to rain bands moving onshore around the weakening Nicole. @live5news tracking and will keep you posted. pic.twitter.com/RN68ediwyB

— Bill Walsh (@BILLWALSHTV) November 10, 2022

Click here to download the free Live 5 First Alert Weather app.

Live 5 Meteorologist Joey Sovine says gusts to tropical storm force are possible Wednesday through Friday.

A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

A tornado watch means conditions are favorable for tornadoes to form, but does not indicate that any actual tornadoes have been detected.

Tropical Storm Nicole has sent multiple homes collapsing into the Atlantic Ocean. Nicole made landfall as a hurricane early Thursday near Vero Beach, Florida, but the brunt of the damage was along the East Coast well north of there, in the Daytona Beach area. Its damaging coastal surge was hitting beachfront properties in Daytona Beach Shores that lost their last protections during Hurricane Ian.

The Live 5 Weather team declared Thursday and Friday as First Alert Weather Days because of possible impacts from the storm.

Sovine says coastal flooding is likely through Friday around high tides with beach erosion and high surf also likely.

Sovine said heavy rain could be possible with rainfall totals between one and four inches. Breezy conditions could occur through Friday and winds may occasionally gust to, or over, 40 mph near the coast.

Nicole became the 14th named storm of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season on Monday.

As of 4 a.m., Nicole was a tropical depression with its center located near latitude 31.9 north and longitude 84.5 west, about 70 miles southwest of Macon, Ga. The storm was moving to the north-northwest at 16 mph and its estimated minimum central pressure is 997 mb or 29.44 inches.

Forecasters say an acceleration toward the north and north-northeast is expected Friday.

On the forecast track, the center of Nicole will move across central and northern Georgia Friday morning and over the western Carolinas later.

Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph with higher gusts. Nicole is expected to become a post-tropical cyclone Friday, then dissipate Friday night or early Saturday as it merges with a frontal system over the eastern United States.

Tropical Storm Warnings are now in effect for Charleston, Berkeley, Coastal Colleton and Beaufort counties. Gusts to tropical storm force(40+mph) are possible today through Friday near the coast. pic.twitter.com/VOkWBvcYTx

— Joey Sovine Live 5 (@JoeySovine) November 9, 2022

City of Charleston officials say they will be closely monitoring the tropical storm. Crews have already begun preparing for potential storm impacts.

“Residents are asked to keep an eye on reliable local weather reports over the next few days,” Emergency Management Director Ben Almquist said in a news release. “If bad conditions do arise, citizens are advised to follow the guidance of Emergency Management officials and, as always, motorists should avoid driving through high water when they encounter it.”

The city’s stormwater department has prepared temporary pumps for low-lying areas. Crews will also be cleaning out ditches and drains in flood-prone areas.

To find out how you can help, visit the Adopt-A-Drain website by clicking here.

The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs through Nov. 30.

Nicole made landfall near Vero Beach as a Category 1 hurricane at about 3 a.m. Thursday, more than a hundred miles south of Daytona Beach Shores, before its maximum sustained winds dropped to 60 mph, the Miami-based center said. The storm was centered about 30 miles southeast of Orlando. It was moving west-northwest near 14 mph.

Robbie Berg, a hurricane specialist at the National Hurricane Center in Miami advised people to understand that hazards from Tropical Storm Nicole “will exist across the state of Florida today.”

Nicole came could briefly emerge over the northeastern corner of the Gulf of Mexico Thursday afternoon before moving over the Florida Panhandle and Georgia, he said.

The storm left south Florida sunny and calm as it moved north, but could dump as much as 6 inches of rain over the Blue Ridge Mountains by Friday, the hurricane center said.

Nicole became a hurricane Wednesday evening as it slammed into Grand Bahama Island. It was the first to hit the Bahamas since Hurricane Dorian, a Category 5 storm that devastated the archipelago in 2019.

For storm-weary Floridians, it is only the third November hurricane to hit their shores since recordkeeping began in 1853. The previous ones were the 1935 Yankee Hurricane and Hurricane Kate in 1985.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. The Associated Press contributed to this report. All rights reserved.

Cool Teacher: Knightsville Elementary School’s Mrs. Kristi O’Callahan

KNIGHTSVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – “She lights up my world.” “She changed my life.” “She’s fun and creative.” “She helped my son.”These are just a few words of adoration used when students and parents talk about Knightsville Elementary Special Education Teacher Kristi O’Callahan – the News 2 Cool Teacher of the week.O’Callahan has a passion for teaching special education. “I feel like this is what I was born to do,” she said. “I never wante...

KNIGHTSVILLE, S.C. (WCBD) – “She lights up my world.” “She changed my life.” “She’s fun and creative.” “She helped my son.”

These are just a few words of adoration used when students and parents talk about Knightsville Elementary Special Education Teacher Kristi O’Callahan – the News 2 Cool Teacher of the week.

O’Callahan has a passion for teaching special education. “I feel like this is what I was born to do,” she said. “I never wanted to be anything else.”

The New York native teaches special education kindergarten through fifth-grade math and English at the Dorchester District 2 school. It’s a role she’s had for the past six years.

“A safe place to love, and learn, and just be awesome,” she said, “They’re not less than. They’re awesome. They’re amazing, and I love them! I love my kids.”

Sixteen years dedicated to special education, O’Callahan said she always wanted to be a teacher.

“The special ed part was a close family friend of ours. Growing up, their son had Down’s syndrome. I saw the way people looked at him differently, or the way they acted around him, but my brother, my cousins, his siblings – we didn’t treat him differently. He was just Patty to us.”

She went on to say, “I just knew I wanted him and kids like him to not feel less than. I just want them to feel special and important. I think that’s what we do here every day, myself, my T-A, that’s what we strive for.”

O’Callahan said she uses a fun multi-sensory approach to teaching.

“We do reading and math primarily, we have fun, too. It’s all about a hands-on multi-sensory approach. So there’s kinesthetics, so we’re moving. I think the most important thing is the relationships that we form first. I think the bond, rapport, and communication. I want them to feel safe, and loved, and important, and special.”

“Once they feel those things, I think then we kick in academics and that’s when they really thrive. I just want to make a difference when they come here because being pulled out of your Gen-Ed setting makes you feel a little different and weird, so I just want them to come here and be happy and excited about my classroom,” she added.

Fourth-grade student Ariyah Hallock says Mrs. O’Callahan changed her life. “She lights up my world. I want to come to her classroom every day because how grateful I am. Over the two years, I’ve been with her, she’s been helping me read and everything she’s done for me, and I’m so thankful for her. She is making a difference,” Ariyah said.

The principal at Knightsville Elementary School, Claire Sieber, said O’Callahan’s energy level and expertise to meet children where they are and to help them grow academically make her the right fit for the school.

“She makes those connections with students that help them to engage in the learning, feel proud of their successes, and want to take the next step in their learning to continue to fill in the academic gaps they might have,” she said.

Parent Bridget Sowards’ son, Daniel, is one of Mrs. O’Callahan’s students. She nominated her to receive the Cool School Teacher award. “She’s making a big difference in our school. Mrs. O’Callahan is an amazing support for Daniel. She would send me emails sometimes and say ‘oh I saw this and thought of Daniel, and maybe you can implement this at home as well.’ It just blows my mind how amazing she is with the kids, and how Daniel is so excited to come to school to be with her and how he has improved in the last two years in English Language Arts by leaps and bounds where he was really struggling,” she said. “He’s beginning to catch up to his peers, which is the whole point of her being with her. She’s really amazing.”

O’Callahan said she’s thankful for the special accolades and recognition. “It’s super overwhelming! I just don’t think about things like that. I come here, I love on my kids. I teach my kids and that’s the most important thing. I love it! It’s amazing! It’s such a good feeling!”

If you would like to nominate a Cool School or educator, send an email to Octavia Mitchell at omitchell@wcbd.com.

FIRST ALERT: Nicole weakens to tropical depression, tornado watch continues

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC/AP) - The National Weather Service says Nicole has weakened to a tropical depression.Our meteorologists say there’s still a slight tornado risk for the Lowcountry.Nicole has weakened to a tropical depression this evening, but a slight tornado risk continues for our area. Stay weather aware through the night! #chswx ...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC/AP) - The National Weather Service says Nicole has weakened to a tropical depression.

Our meteorologists say there’s still a slight tornado risk for the Lowcountry.

Nicole has weakened to a tropical depression this evening, but a slight tornado risk continues for our area. Stay weather aware through the night! #chswx pic.twitter.com/Pxq4KCYNcM

— Stephanie (@stephaniesinewx) November 11, 2022

The tornado watch will last until 1 a.m. Friday and includes Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Georgetown, Orangeburg and Williamsburg Counties.

Earlier in the day, a tornado warning for Colleton and Dorchester Counties expired.

A severe thunderstorm capable of producing a tornado was located at 5:17 p.m. near Knightsville, moving northwest at 45 mph, according to the National Weather Service. The warning expired at 5:45 p.m.

A tropical storm warning expired for Charleston, Berkeley and coastal Colleton Counties Thursday afternoon. However, the waters off the coast from Jasper County to the Charleston-Georgetown line are still under a tropical storm warning.

SEVERE WEATHER THREAT// Storm Prediction Center issued a 2 out of 5 threat for severe weather tonight into early tomorrow morning. Main threat will be isolated tornadoes due to rain bands moving onshore around the weakening Nicole. @live5news tracking and will keep you posted. pic.twitter.com/RN68ediwyB

— Bill Walsh (@BILLWALSHTV) November 10, 2022

Click here to download the free Live 5 First Alert Weather app.

Live 5 Meteorologist Joey Sovine says gusts to tropical storm force are possible Wednesday through Friday.

A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

A tornado watch means conditions are favorable for tornadoes to form, but does not indicate that any actual tornadoes have been detected.

Tropical Storm Nicole has sent multiple homes collapsing into the Atlantic Ocean. Nicole made landfall as a hurricane early Thursday near Vero Beach, Florida, but the brunt of the damage was along the East Coast well north of there, in the Daytona Beach area. Its damaging coastal surge was hitting beachfront properties in Daytona Beach Shores that lost their last protections during Hurricane Ian.

The Live 5 Weather team declared Thursday and Friday as First Alert Weather Days because of possible impacts from the storm.

Sovine says coastal flooding is likely through Friday around high tides with beach erosion and high surf also likely.

Sovine said heavy rain could be possible with rainfall totals between one and four inches. Breezy conditions could occur through Friday and winds may occasionally gust to, or over, 40 mph near the coast.

Nicole became the 14th named storm of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season on Monday.

As of 7 p.m., Nicole remained a tropical storm with its center located near latitude 30 north and longitude 83.8 west, about 40 miles southeast of Tallahassee. The storm was moving to the northwest at 15 mph and its estimated minimum central pressure is 990 mb or 29.24 inches.

Forecasters say a turn toward the northwest and north-northwest is expected later Thursday and Thursday night, followed by an acceleration toward the north and north-northeast on Friday.

On the forecast track, the center of Nicole will move across central Florida this morning, possibly emerge over the far northeastern Gulf of Mexico Monday afternoon, and then move across the Florida panhandle and Georgia Thursday night and on Friday.

Nicole is still a large tropical storm but maximum sustained winds have decreased to near 45 mph with higher gusts.

Tropical Storm Warnings are now in effect for Charleston, Berkeley, Coastal Colleton and Beaufort counties. Gusts to tropical storm force(40+mph) are possible today through Friday near the coast. pic.twitter.com/VOkWBvcYTx

— Joey Sovine Live 5 (@JoeySovine) November 9, 2022

City of Charleston officials say they will be closely monitoring the tropical storm. Crews have already begun preparing for potential storm impacts.

“Residents are asked to keep an eye on reliable local weather reports over the next few days,” Emergency Management Director Ben Almquist said in a news release. “If bad conditions do arise, citizens are advised to follow the guidance of Emergency Management officials and, as always, motorists should avoid driving through high water when they encounter it.”

The city’s stormwater department has prepared temporary pumps for low-lying areas. Crews will also be cleaning out ditches and drains in flood-prone areas.

To find out how you can help, visit the Adopt-A-Drain website by clicking here.

The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs through Nov. 30.

Nicole made landfall near Vero Beach as a Category 1 hurricane at about 3 a.m. Thursday, more than a hundred miles south of Daytona Beach Shores, before its maximum sustained winds dropped to 60 mph, the Miami-based center said. The storm was centered about 30 miles southeast of Orlando. It was moving west-northwest near 14 mph.

Robbie Berg, a hurricane specialist at the National Hurricane Center in Miami advised people to understand that hazards from Tropical Storm Nicole “will exist across the state of Florida today.”

Nicole came could briefly emerge over the northeastern corner of the Gulf of Mexico Thursday afternoon before moving over the Florida Panhandle and Georgia, he said.

The storm left south Florida sunny and calm as it moved north, but could dump as much as 6 inches of rain over the Blue Ridge Mountains by Friday, the hurricane center said.

Nicole became a hurricane Wednesday evening as it slammed into Grand Bahama Island. It was the first to hit the Bahamas since Hurricane Dorian, a Category 5 storm that devastated the archipelago in 2019.

For storm-weary Floridians, it is only the third November hurricane to hit their shores since recordkeeping began in 1853. The previous ones were the 1935 Yankee Hurricane and Hurricane Kate in 1985.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. The Associated Press contributed to this report. All rights reserved.

FIRST ALERT: Tornado watches end for Lowcountry counties

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC/AP) - Tornado watches around the Lowcountry have been allowed to expire as Tropical Depression Nicole moves farther from South Carolina.Remnants of Tropical Storm Nicole put the Lowcountry under tornado watches throughout Thursday night going into Friday morning.Most of the watches ended Friday morning, and a watch for Georgetown and Williamsburg Counties ended just before noon. Two tornado warnings were issued in the Tri-County during the storm activity.A tornado warning was issued at 12:20 a.m. f...

CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC/AP) - Tornado watches around the Lowcountry have been allowed to expire as Tropical Depression Nicole moves farther from South Carolina.

Remnants of Tropical Storm Nicole put the Lowcountry under tornado watches throughout Thursday night going into Friday morning.

Most of the watches ended Friday morning, and a watch for Georgetown and Williamsburg Counties ended just before noon. Two tornado warnings were issued in the Tri-County during the storm activity.

A tornado warning was issued at 12:20 a.m. for parts of Charleston County, however, it expired at 12:41 a.m.

Another warning came Thursday afternoon as a severe thunderstorm capable of producing a tornado was located at 5:17 p.m. near Knightsville The warning expired at 5:45 p.m.

The National Weather Service has not verified if any tornados touchdown during either of the warnings. Meanwhile, the South Carolina Emergency Management Division says county emergency managers across the state reported minimal damages. None of the managers requested state assistance.

Click here to download the free Live 5 First Alert Weather app.

Live 5 Meteorologist Joey Sovine says gusts to tropical storm force are possible Wednesday through Friday.

A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected somewhere within the warning area.

A tornado watch means conditions are favorable for tornadoes to form, but does not indicate that any actual tornadoes have been detected.

Tropical Storm Nicole has sent multiple homes collapsing into the Atlantic Ocean. Nicole made landfall as a hurricane early Thursday near Vero Beach, Florida, but the brunt of the damage was along the East Coast well north of there, in the Daytona Beach area. Its damaging coastal surge was hitting beachfront properties in Daytona Beach Shores that lost their last protections during Hurricane Ian.

The Live 5 Weather team declared Thursday and Friday as First Alert Weather Days because of possible impacts from the storm.

Sovine says coastal flooding is likely through Friday around high tides with beach erosion and high surf also likely.

Sovine said heavy rain could be possible with rainfall totals between one and four inches. Breezy conditions could occur through Friday and winds may occasionally gust to, or over, 40 mph near the coast.

Nicole became the 14th named storm of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season on Monday.

As of 10 a.m., Nicole was a tropical depression with its center located near latitude 34.2 north and longitude 84.3 west, about 35 miles north of Atlanta, Ga. The storm was moving to the north-northeast at 23 mph and its estimated minimum central pressure is 1001 mb or 29.56 inches.

Forecasters say an acceleration toward the north and north-northeast is expected Friday.

On the forecast track, the center of Nicole will move across central and northern Georgia Friday morning and over the western Carolinas later.

Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph with higher gusts. Nicole is expected to become a post-tropical cyclone Friday, then dissipate Friday night or early Saturday as it merges with a frontal system over the eastern United States.

Tropical Storm Warnings are now in effect for Charleston, Berkeley, Coastal Colleton and Beaufort counties. Gusts to tropical storm force(40+mph) are possible today through Friday near the coast. pic.twitter.com/VOkWBvcYTx

— Joey Sovine Live 5 (@JoeySovine) November 9, 2022

City of Charleston officials say they will be closely monitoring the tropical storm. Crews have already begun preparing for potential storm impacts.

“Residents are asked to keep an eye on reliable local weather reports over the next few days,” Emergency Management Director Ben Almquist said in a news release. “If bad conditions do arise, citizens are advised to follow the guidance of Emergency Management officials and, as always, motorists should avoid driving through high water when they encounter it.”

The city’s stormwater department has prepared temporary pumps for low-lying areas. Crews will also be cleaning out ditches and drains in flood-prone areas.

To find out how you can help, visit the Adopt-A-Drain website by clicking here.

The Atlantic Hurricane Season runs through Nov. 30.

Nicole made landfall near Vero Beach as a Category 1 hurricane at about 3 a.m. Thursday, more than a hundred miles south of Daytona Beach Shores, before its maximum sustained winds dropped to 60 mph, the Miami-based center said. The storm was centered about 30 miles southeast of Orlando. It was moving west-northwest near 14 mph.

Robbie Berg, a hurricane specialist at the National Hurricane Center in Miami advised people to understand that hazards from Tropical Storm Nicole “will exist across the state of Florida today.”

Nicole came could briefly emerge over the northeastern corner of the Gulf of Mexico Thursday afternoon before moving over the Florida Panhandle and Georgia, he said.

The storm left south Florida sunny and calm as it moved north, but could dump as much as 6 inches of rain over the Blue Ridge Mountains by Friday, the hurricane center said.

Nicole became a hurricane Wednesday evening as it slammed into Grand Bahama Island. It was the first to hit the Bahamas since Hurricane Dorian, a Category 5 storm that devastated the archipelago in 2019.

For storm-weary Floridians, it is only the third November hurricane to hit their shores since recordkeeping began in 1853. The previous ones were the 1935 Yankee Hurricane and Hurricane Kate in 1985.

Copyright 2022 WCSC. The Associated Press contributed to this report. All rights reserved.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.