Pressure Washingin Sullivan's Island, SC

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Power Wash Sullivan's Island, SC

Sullivan's Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Sullivan's Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Sullivan's Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Sullivan's Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Sullivan's Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Sullivan's Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Sullivan's Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Sullivan's Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

 Power Washer Sullivan's Island, SC

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Sullivan's Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

 Pressure Wash Sullivan's Island, SC

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Sullivan's Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we work with business owners across Sullivan's Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Sullivan's Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

 Pressure Washer Sullivan's Island, SC

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

 Best Pressure Washer Sullivan's Island, SC

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Sullivan's Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Sullivan's Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Town leaders, advocates say cutting of Sullivan’s Island Maritime Forest likely illegal

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town official...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND, S.C. (WCBD) – Sullivan’s Island leaders say they’re hiring an attorney to look at ways to overturn a plan that could lead to large portions of the island’s maritime forest being cut down. The vote to hire Attorney William Wilkin came just days after a portion of the forest was potentially illegally cut near Station 26 on the island.

Drone footage provided by SI4ALL shows a section roughly the width of a house was cleared. The clearing is raising concerns for residents while town officials say they are investigating to determine if the cutting was illegal.

“We were heartbroken and devastated to see the extent of the cutting,” says Karen Byko, President of SI4ALL.

The clearing has town leaders and residents including Byko scrambling to stop the chop of the island’s accreted forest the say provides protection from storms and flooding while offering a home for native wildlife.

“Concern is that we are devastating the very thing that is protecting us and it provides a home to our wildlife partners,” says Byko.

A majority of the cutting happened behind a house near Station 26 on Atlantic Avenue. Zillow records show the house was listed for sale on February 10th, around the time the cutting was believed to have happened, for $2.9 million. The house was then taken off the market five days later on February 15th after concerns over the cutting were raised at a town council meeting.

News 2 went to the home in front of the cutting to ask the owners if they knew anything about the cutting, a housekeeper was the only person home at the time and declined to answer questions.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control says they haven’t received any tree cutting permits from either the Town of Sullivan’s Island or private residents. The agency says they recommended more discussion at the local level late last year before permitting any clearing of vegetation.

Town councilmembers Gary Visser and Scott Millimet called the cutting illegal and disheartening to see.

“The disregard for our community that they are a part of,” says Visser. Millimet called the act “extremely selfish.”

Sullivan’s Island Mayor Pat O’neil says the town is conducting a serious and thorough investigation into the cutting to identify those responsible and hold them accountable. Town officials are hopeful stricter penalties for cutting trees will be adopted by Town Council moving forward.

“If somebody says you’re going to have to wear an orange jumpsuit for 30 days, that might be a bigger deterrent,” says Millimet.

“We hope that they will prosecute to the fullest extent of the law,” says Byko.

The Army Corps of Engineers says they have not been contacted to investigate the cutting. Town officials say they will continue to investigate the incident.

SC finishes sea turtle nesting season with record-breaking inventory

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are ...

Slowly but surely, sea turtles are making strides in South Carolina.

Nesting season wrapped up Oct. 31, and the state finished with 8,002 nests — its second-highest total on record.

Nest counts have averaged about 5,600 the past two years, but the S.C. Department of Natural Resources said it is not usual for record-breaking years to follow low nesting years.

For example, the 8,795 nests counted in 2019 were more than triple the 2,766 reported in 2018.

As numbers across the Southeast trend upward, biologists are optimistic the reptiles are beginning to recover.

“Increased nest counts since the mid- to late-2000s show promise for the loggerhead,” said Michelle Pate, nesting program leader for DNR. “We’re seeing the continued benefits of conservation measured enacted decades ago as well as those management techniques still used today.”

Among the most interesting finds this season was the oddity of a leucistic sea turtle on Folly Beach. While most loggerhead turtles are dark, leucistic animals are white, pale or patchy in color because of their reduced pigmentation.

Dave Miller, the permit holder for the Folly Beach Turtle Team, found the special turtle in September.

“I saw these two turtles coming out of the nest and they were covered with sand,” Miller said. “And then the wave washed them over and one of them was white. I didn’t realize it when it was covered in sand.”

Leucism increases animals’ chances of being taken by predators. And in areas like Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island, coyotes are among the top predators for sea turtles.

Turtle patrol volunteers work to find sea turtle nests on beaches before coyotes do.

“What the Wild Dunes coyotes have learned to do is ambush the turtle as she comes out of the water in the middle of the night and begins to lay her eggs,” said Mary Pringle, a project leader for the Island Turtle Team in Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island.

The coyotes will often eat the turtle’s eggs before volunteers can get to them in the morning and place plastic screens over the nests. The animals can’t destroy the nests once that happens. But volunteers can’t predict when and where a turtle will choose to nest.

“When I started (volunteering), we didn’t have any coyotes,” Pringle said. “We had raccoons and ghost crabs as predators, but not coyotes. And it’s just something that’s happening all over the coast.”

Foxes and the emergence of armadillos on beaches have also become a reason for nest losses in the state.

Pate said other concerns include artificial lighting on heavily populated beaches, and people intercepting nesting females at night.

Even with predators like coyotes, sea turtle species in the state have found a way to prevail. Many new turtles nested here for the first time this season.

“And they (scientists) are cautiously optimistic that it will continue because of nest protection efforts — saving nests, making sure they hatch like we did and all the other people who do the same thing that we do for DNR,” Pringle said.

Pringle’s Island Turtle Team is one of about 30 groups along the coast that patrol beaches from May 1 to Oct. 31 to count, monitor and protect the nests. DNR said there are more than 1,500 volunteers coastwide.

Fifty-seven total nests were spotted this year on the Isle of Palms and Sullivan’s Island. And 4,602 turtles hatched on those islands.

Most of the nests there were in the Wild Dunes area.

Thirty-four nests were were counted on Myrtle Beach; 99 on Folly Beach; 483 on Kiawah Island; 351 at Edisto Beach State Park; and 423 on Hilton Head Island, according to data.

Loggerheads nest on the state’s shores more often than any other species, but greens, Kemp’s ridleys and leatherbacks also have a presence here.

Each species is classified as endangered or threatened and receive protections under the Endangered Species Acts. Extra state protections are also in place.

This year, 7,974 nests were counted in the state, 21 green turtle nests and one Kemp’s ridley nest.

Green turtles and Kemp’s ridleys are primarily found in other regions of North America, including Florida and the western Gulf of Mexico.

“I think in the history of Folly Beach Turtle Team, we’ve had maybe two leatherbacks,” Miller said. “And everything else has been loggerheads.”

Other species will pop up on the beach, maybe for food, but choose to nest in other locations.

DNR said beachgoers can help the state’s sea turtles by keeping beaches clean, giving the animals and their nests space and turning beachfront lights out to avoid disorienting them during nesting season.

Men's lacrosse announces 2023 signing class

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond men's lacrosse announced the members of its 2023 signing class Wednesday, one week after prospective student-athletes enrolling in college in 2023 were first eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent.Twelve players signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Richmond and compete for the Spiders as freshmen in 2023-24. The group is comprised of five players from New York – including three players from Long Island – two players from Ontario, and one each from Georgia, Mass...

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond men's lacrosse announced the members of its 2023 signing class Wednesday, one week after prospective student-athletes enrolling in college in 2023 were first eligible to sign a National Letter of Intent.

Twelve players signed a National Letter of Intent to attend Richmond and compete for the Spiders as freshmen in 2023-24. The group is comprised of five players from New York – including three players from Long Island – two players from Ontario, and one each from Georgia, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Virginia.

"The 12 young men that just signed their NLIs are an accomplished group," said Spiders head coach Dan Chemotti. "They are stellar students, from lacrosse hotbeds and non-traditional areas, including Canada, and they have excelled in a variety of sports. Above all else, they are phenomenal people with great character who have what it takes to continue the championship culture we've established over the last 10 years. The level of talent in this class is a credit to the hard work by our assistant coaches and the fact that the University of Richmond is, without question, the full package."

Richmond is one of the nation's most successful men's lacrosse programs, having reached the NCAA Tournament in four of the last eight seasons. The Spiders, 2022 Southern Conference champions, have played in eight straight conference championship games, the longest active streak in Division I. In May, the program announced it would move to the Atlantic 10 in 2023 to compete in the inaugural season of A-10 men's lacrosse. UR will be joined by High Point, Hobart, Massachusetts, Saint Joseph's, and St. Bonaventure in the league.

Names, positions, high schools, and hometowns for Richmond's 2023 signing class are below.

NAME (POSITION) - HIGH SCHOOL (HOMETOWN) Gavin Creo (Attack) - Chaminade (Rockville Centre, NY) Michael Fagen (Midfield) - Lynbrook (Lynbrook, NY) Lucas Littlejohn (Attack/Midfield) - Holy Trinity (Courtice, Ontario) Luke Meyer (Attack/Midfield) - Port Washington (Port Washington, NY) Nate Murphy (Defense) - Paul VI (Chantilly, VA) Charlie Packard (Midfield) - Hingham (Hingham, MA) Brayden Penafeather-Stevenson (Defense) - Baldwinsville (Baldwinsville, NY) Sean Siegel (Defense) - Byram Hills (Pleasantville, NY) Lucas Slate (Attack/Midfield) - Episcopal (Downingtown, PA) Tye Steenhuis (Midfield) - Hill Academy (St. Catharines, Ontario) Jackson Strickland (Face Off) - Calvert Hall (Sullivan's Island, SC) Aidan Wooley (Midfield) - Westminster (Atlanta, GA)

An interview with Cadet Col. Brandon Johnson, this year’s Regimental Commander

Each year, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO sits down with the Regimental Commander so that the community gets to know more about the current commander and how he is leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.Cadet. Col. Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Supply Chain Management major and a member of the Junior Sword Arch and the Hollingsworth Society.Earlier this year, Johnson answered a series of questions from Josh Tolbert, this year’s Regimental Public Affairs NCO.Q&...

Each year, the Regimental Public Affairs NCO sits down with the Regimental Commander so that the community gets to know more about the current commander and how he is leading the South Carolina Corps of Cadets.

Cadet. Col. Brandon Johnson was born and raised in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Supply Chain Management major and a member of the Junior Sword Arch and the Hollingsworth Society.

Earlier this year, Johnson answered a series of questions from Josh Tolbert, this year’s Regimental Public Affairs NCO.

Q&A with Brandon Johnson

What is one word that you would use to describe yourself?

Fearless.

How do you spend your free time?

I always get a workout and a run in. My schedule is busy, but exercise is a daily priority. On the weekends, I enjoy spending time with friends and family. You can always catch me on the boat or the beach. I live right next to Sullivan’s Island, so I frequently spend time there.

What is a quote you live by?

There are two. The first is just two words — “Never settle.” I first started using this short phrase my sophomore year and it has stuck with me ever since. I also live by the Bible verse Isaiah 6:8: “And I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?’ Then I said, ‘Here am I! Send me.’” Stepping up to a challenge is something I take pride in, and I am always looking for one.

Why did you choose The Citadel?

In high school, I planned on attending the University of South Carolina. I vividly remember sitting down at the dinner table and deciding that I was going to attend The Citadel. I changed my mind because I was seeking a lifestyle that was uncommon for most people my age. I knew the structure and discipline would benefit me. Thankfully I made the right decision, and I have not looked back since.

Who inspires you the most and why?

My father is a huge inspiration for me, his character and selflessness are something I truly admire. No matter what decision I make, he always supports me. I frequently call him to ask for advice and he always seems to have the right answer. Without my parents, I would be no where near where I am today. He has made countless sacrifices for me and my siblings. He always pushes me to be my best in any endeavor.

What made you want to become the Regimental Commander and what are your goals for the school year?

I love The Citadel and wanted to make a difference for my fellow cadets. I am fortunate to have great mentors who always push me to be my best here, and they are a big reason why I made it this far. At the beginning of the year, my main goals were to develop as many leaders as possible, give cadets the ability to lead and to create an environment that is both productive and enjoyable. I want everyone to take pride in their Citadel experience.

As a knob, did you ever see yourself becoming the Regimental Commander?

I was not dead set on becoming the Regimental Commander, however, I knew I could do it if I set my mind to it — I knew I had the potential. I learned early on that my effort was the only limiting factor to my success in life. I always wanted to be a commander at some level. At the end of the day, I wanted to be a leader.

You are the Regimental Commander the same year the Citadel celebrates 100 Years on the Ashley. How important and special is that to you?

It is very important to me. I have always had an astounding amount of respect for all of the classes that came before mine. The legacies they left behind are still carried throughout the Corp of Cadets. The Citadel truly is a special place and it is an honor to be carrying on the legacy of the campus. The cadets are what make the past 100 years so meaningful. Without the past, present and future cadets, The Citadel’s life-changing experience would disappear. I hope to see another 100 years of the road less traveled.

What is your plan after you graduate and what will you miss the most after you graduate?

I am going to begin my career right here in Charleston. Thankfully, I am fortunate to have professional experience in the maritime logistics industry through past internships. I have no doubt I will miss all the brothers and sisters I have gained along the way. I am beyond fortunate to be surrounded by peers who constantly push themselves. Being surrounded by the best 18-to-22-year-olds in the country is a humbling and rewarding experience.

What life lesson have you learned here that you will take with you after you graduate?

I have learned so much that it’s honestly hard to put it into words. I developed what I believe to be the most important and beneficial trait for any human — discipline. I’ve learned that means doing the things you need to do when you don’t want to do them and having a constant force pushing me to be my best every day. Discipline is earned through the challenges we face here.

Joshua Tolbert is a junior from North Charleston, South Carolina and a computer engineering major. On campus, he is the Regimental Public Affairs NCO and participates in the Gospel Choir, African American Association and The National Society of Black Engineers. After graduation, Tolbert plans to become a database administrator.

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Sullivan’s Island restaurant opens with fresh fish, ’1970s-inspired’ beachside aesthetic

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood an...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Sullivan’s Seafood Restaurant was an island staple from 1988 until Sept. 6, 2020, when owners Sammy Rhodes and Donna Rhodes Hiott permanently closed the local favorite. Ben and Kate Towill hope their restaurant — which opened in the 2019 Middle St. space May 17 — will honor the building’s past while ushering it into the future.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is now open, serving customers local seafood and beach-themed cocktails Tuesday through Sunday.

The Towills are the owners of design and hospitality firm Basic Projects. Kate, head of design for the Charleston-based company, has led the design of residential and commercial properties, including an athletic club and Basic Projects’ two other restaurants: Basic Kitchen and Post House.

Alongside her husband, Basic Projects head of operations Eva Suarez and other members of the team, Kate led the two-year renovation of Sullivan’s Fish Camp, where she set out to create a 1970s-inspired beachside aesthetic. Her goal was to give the space a fresh look with elements honoring Sullivan’s Seafood, like a framed flag and original menu.

A place that feels new and nostalgic all at once.

“That’s been the biggest compliment that we have received is (people saying) ‘Oh it feels like it’s been here forever,’ ” Kate Towill said.

Leading the kitchen as executive chef is Davis Hood, who grew up on Isle of Palms with his brother Nathan, culinary director of Basic Projects. Hood, who recalls walking by the Middle Street building on his way to Sullivan’s Island Elementary School, is focusing on sustainability at the new Sullivan’s Island restaurant.

Local purveyors like Abundant Seafood, Tarvin Seafood, Lowcountry Oyster Co., Vertical Roots and Peculiar Pig Farm dot the Sullivan’s Fish Camp menu.

“It’s not your average fish camp in my eyes,” Hood said. “The whole concept of snout to tail cooking, we’re trying to bring that vibe but with fish. Understanding that the ocean is such an important part of our lives and not trying to have any waste.”

If there is one dish that epitomizes this approach, it’s the Sullivan’s Island Gumbo that features Tarvin Seafood shrimp, clams, okra, lobster broth, dayboat fish and Anson Mills Charleston Gold Rice. The West African style gumbo’s gluten-free base is made using chicken bones, lobster shells, shrimp shells, fennel, celery, palm oil and Bradford Family Farm okra, which replaces a roux as the stew’s thickening agent.

Ben Towill said the gumbo, along with the pan-roasted fish of the day and tempura nori tuna with furikake aioli have been some of the restaurant’s top sellers in its first weeks of service.

“We feel like the menu’s been received really well,” Ben Towill said. “Guests and everyone have felt really comfortable which has been a big bonus.”

Fresh seafood isn’t the only element that gives Sullivan’s Fish Camp that desired beachside feel. Self-described “fruity” cocktails like the tequila-based Sumter’s Watch, rum-based Sullivan Swizzle and the frozen paloma will immediately put patrons on island time.

Sullivan’s Fish Camp is open for dinner from 5-10 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, and lunch is currently served from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. The restaurant plans to eventually serve lunch and dinner daily.

For more information, visit sullivansfishcamp.com or call 843-883-2100.

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