Pressure Washingin Sullivan's Island, SC

Platform Lifts-phone-number 843-593-6815

Free Estimate

Our customer's satisfaction is our top priority

We appreciate you for choosing Palmetto Pressure Clean.

Power Wash Sullivan's Island, SC

Sullivan's Island is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Sullivan's Island. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Sullivan's Island, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Sullivan's Island are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Sullivan's Island. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Sullivan's Island. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Sullivan's Island, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Sullivan's Island, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

 Power Washer Sullivan's Island, SC

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Sullivan's Island, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

 Pressure Wash Sullivan's Island, SC

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Sullivan's Island, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we work with business owners across Sullivan's Island who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Sullivan's Island, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

 Pressure Washer Sullivan's Island, SC

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Sullivan's Island, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

 Best Pressure Washer Sullivan's Island, SC

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Sullivan's Island, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Sullivan's Island, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Sullivan's Island? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

Free Consultation

Latest News in Sullivan's Island, SC

Message From The Sullivan’s Island Mayor: December 2022

Dear Island Neighbors,I hope y’all had a great Christmas and are on your way to a healthy, happy, peaceful and rewarding 2023.For this episode of “As The Year Turns,” we’ve got a number of items.Town Hall New Year’s Day holiday observanceSince Jan. 1 is a Sunday, the holiday will be observed with Town Hall closed on Monday, Jan. 2. The usual garbage and yard debris collection schedules will be unaffected. Of course, all public safety and other essential functions will be fully staffed...

Dear Island Neighbors,

I hope y’all had a great Christmas and are on your way to a healthy, happy, peaceful and rewarding 2023.

For this episode of “As The Year Turns,” we’ve got a number of items.

Town Hall New Year’s Day holiday observance

Since Jan. 1 is a Sunday, the holiday will be observed with Town Hall closed on Monday, Jan. 2. The usual garbage and yard debris collection schedules will be unaffected. Of course, all public safety and other essential functions will be fully staffed over the holiday weekend. … and then some: See the next item.

New Year’s Day Polar Plunge

The 28th Annual Polar Plunge event, originated and promoted by Dunleavy’s Pub, is now a treasured New Year’s Day tradition for the entire island. The actual plunge into the water is at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 1, but folks will begin gathering and celebrating hours before that. Many of our Island restaurants will be participating with special outside service for food and beverages. Please be careful driving through the commercial district, and remember that many more folks than usual will be milling about very close to Middle Street. Station 22½ seaward of Middle Street will be closed to vehicular traffic. Please recall that the “Reason For The Freezin’” is to raise funds for the Special Olympics. Come out to celebrate with neighbors and strangers, enjoy food and beverage, but please bring cash to contribute to the many Special Olympics volunteers. If you plan to actually join – vs. watch – the plunge, here is a tip from painful personal experience: Wear some kind of dunkable footwear. Running barefoot over hard-packed little sand ridges gets painful quickly, especially in the cold. Wear your wackiest costume. (Tom P.: I know you don’t need encouragement) Come on out to see hundreds of your neighbors go off their meds all at once at a great family event.

Possible IOP Connector reconfiguration concepts

You may recall that the South Carolina Department of Transportation re-striped the Connector a couple years ago, and that those changes have not been universally applauded. Recently, SCDOT representatives made a presentation to the IOP City Council to show several possible reconfigurations to address issues with the current layout. Mayor Pounds and his Council graciously invited us to attend that presentation, which is summarized here: bit.ly/ IOPConnector. SCDOT will be soliciting public comments on all this in the near future, so stay tuned.

Vehicle Identification tags for emergency re-entry to the island

Those island decals we’ve become accustomed to having on our windshields, designed to identify residents so they can re-enter the island in the event of an emergency, have outlived their usefulness. We are replacing them with tags to be hung from your inside rearview mirror when needed. They are issued per licensed resident in each household, with verification of their Sullivan’s Island address on their driver’s license. Nonresidents may have up to two per property with verification of ID and one of the following: real estate closing statement, property tax bill or tax return. Proof of partnership must be provided for properties owned by an LLC or other entity. Get yours now. Whenever the need for them arises, you will be very occupied with other urgent things.

Charlie Post 5K and 15K Run and Walk

It’s hard to believe this is the 39th annual occurrence of this run/walk event, always in a time of the year with wildly unpredictable weather – and tidal – conditions, but here we are. It’s happening Saturday, Jan. 28, at 8:30 a.m. Over the years, we’ve had gale-force winds, blinding fog, frigid cold, stifling heat – for January – ultra-high tide that put a half-foot of cold water over part of the course. … you name it. Last year we got to check what may have been the last open weather box: a few flakes of snow. While that admittedly doesn’t sound like much of a sales pitch, especially the snowflakes, this really is a very interesting event right here in our neighborhood. And part of the proceeds go to our Fire and Rescue Squad. For more info: charliepostclassic.com. I hope to see you there.

Dog tag renewal time

If you’ve got a pooch, don’t forget it’s time to renew Fido’s town license. Info is at bit.ly/ SIDOG.

See you around the island, and here’s to a wonderful 2023 for all of us.

Mayor Pat O’Neil

843-670-9266

@oneilpm1

oneilp@sullivansisland.sc.gov

Video by Rusty Williamson for Island Eye News

Your email address will not be published.

<div pseudo="-webkit-input-placeholder" id="placeholder" style="display: block !important;">Your message</div><div></div>

Gianduja Polenta Cake

<div pseudo="-webkit-input-placeholder" id="placeholder" style="display: block !important;">Do you have an Eye Capture you would like to share? Submit your image here:</div><div></div>

Dunleavy’s Pub Polar Plunge celebrates 20 years

Families and friends gathered en masse on the beach at 2 p.m. Sunday to greet the new year with a chilling dive into the Atlantic Ocean during the 20th annual Dunleavy’s Pub Polar Plunge on Sullivan’s Island. A similar event occurred Sunday at Folly Beach.“It’s a good way to start the new year and ring it in with good feelings and vibrations,” said Jamie Maher, owner of Dunleavy’s Pub, which started the event 20 years ago.Pub founder Bill Dunleavy jumped in the ocean on New Year’s Day w...

Families and friends gathered en masse on the beach at 2 p.m. Sunday to greet the new year with a chilling dive into the Atlantic Ocean during the 20th annual Dunleavy’s Pub Polar Plunge on Sullivan’s Island. A similar event occurred Sunday at Folly Beach.

“It’s a good way to start the new year and ring it in with good feelings and vibrations,” said Jamie Maher, owner of Dunleavy’s Pub, which started the event 20 years ago.

Pub founder Bill Dunleavy jumped in the ocean on New Year’s Day with a group of friends two decades ago, Maher said, and since then it’s grown into a time-honored tradition. This year’s event garnered about 1,000 people.

Dunleavy’s opened bright and early for the pre-party. After a glacial dip into the 52-degree ocean, participants funneled back to Middle Street to keep the block party going with the pub’s neighboring restaurants.

“Years ago, we connected with the Special Olympics South Carolina, so that’s been a big draw,” Maher said. “We call it ‘freezing for a reason.’ People come down and donate money, and we’ve raised more than $500,000 over the past few years. All the restaurants out here also donate a percentage of sales to the Special Olympics.”

Why do they jump in the cold water?

Tom Lawrence of Mount Pleasant has been doing the polar plunge with his family for the past three years after relocating from Boston.

“It’s a great way to start a new year and start off on a positive foot,” Lawrence told the City Paper while standing on the beach in a Grinch costume with a Santa beard. It’s the second year he’s dressed as the Grinch to take an icy dip in the Atlantic with his family.

“My daughter Bella loves doing this,” he said. “She loves the ocean and loves the celebration.”

While most people were dressed in regular swimsuits or bikinis, some of the costumes included plungers dressed as hot dogs, the Grim Reaper and Santa.

“People were seriously into it,” one observer said.

Maher said his favorite part of the celebration is the assortment of costumes worn by participants.

“When I was down on the beach earlier, I saw some kids who are now grown adults who I’ve known since they were little doing the plunge,” he said. “I love seeing that over the years, the tradition is continuing on.”

Stay cool. Support City Paper.

City Paper has been bringing the best news, food, arts, music and event coverage to the Holy City since 1997. Support our continued efforts to highlight the best of Charleston with a one-time donation or become a member of the City Paper Club.

Sullivan's Island residents launch campaign to get rid of fractional ownership homes

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island banned short-term rentals more than two decades ago, except those that were grandfathered in.Residents are concerned with one company they say is bending the rules.Tim Emrich says the home, located at 3115 Ion Avenue, has fractional ownership and is overseen by Pacaso.Emrich said Sullivan's Island is for families and retirees, not people on vacation, and with three children, they don’t want to live next to a home with many different owners.According to...

SULLIVAN'S ISLAND, S.C. (WCIV) — Sullivan's Island banned short-term rentals more than two decades ago, except those that were grandfathered in.

Residents are concerned with one company they say is bending the rules.

Tim Emrich says the home, located at 3115 Ion Avenue, has fractional ownership and is overseen by Pacaso.

Emrich said Sullivan's Island is for families and retirees, not people on vacation, and with three children, they don’t want to live next to a home with many different owners.

According to him, other residents on Sullivan's Island share his opinion and are not happy about it.

To try and stop it, he and his wife created a campaign to keep Sullivan's Island community oriented.

"We saw an advertisement where you could buy 1/8 of the house. After we dug a little deeper, it became apparent that this was, this is really a scheme to circumvent the rules that have been in place for over 20 years in a small town that limit short-term rentals; they prohibit them unless you were one of the properties prior 20 years ago," Emrich said.

Driving up and down streets on Sullivan's Island, you can't miss the signs that read "Stop timeshares on Sullivan's."

Emrich and his wife passed around the yard signs and have been attending town council meetings to try and stop Pacaso from selling homes on the barrier island.

"Our aim is to first of all raise awareness. We've obviously got over 200 signs out across the island. Any residents you speak to on Sullivan's Island adamantly oppose this game. Every member of the council is opposed to the scheme. And so, really, we're pushing the politicians to do something about it," Emrich said.

Emrich tells us the campaign's primary goal is to get town leaders to enforce the rules that are already on the books and push these types of companies and homes out.

He says communities across the country have successfully fought these types of companies.

"They're assuring us that they are on this. The government does not move this fast, and we would like them to, but they are giving us every assurance that they that they're going to do something about it," Emrich said.

Mayor Patrick O'Neil says residents feel short-term rentals destroy the sense of neighborhood.

He thinks no one wants to live next to a group of people on their first night of vacation.

“After a great deal of research and study, last week we issued a notice of zoning violation to the owners of the property in question here, and we are awaiting a response," Mayor O'Brien said.

Pacaso spokesperson Brian McGuigan stated: "Pacaso is not a timeshare. We help families co-own second homes, which is common practice and can help reduce competition for single-family homes on Sullivan's Island. Research shows that co-ownership contributes more to the local economy than the typical second home while redirecting second home buyers away from median-priced single-family homes in demand by locals and into high-end, luxury homes.”

Pacaso explains they aren’t a timeshare and retain no ownership interest in the home once sold, but they provide property management services.

Pacaso insists they will collaborate with Sullivan's Island leaders on any related public policy questions.

The company believes an ordinance addressing Pacaso’s model could broadly impact many houses.

Coexistence is key to dealing with IOP coyotes, animal control says

Though coyote sightings were significantly down on the Isle of Palms in 2022, this largely has to do with the way sightings are recorded. The coyote dens, particularly in the Wild Dunes area of the island, are still active and coexistence is key when it comes to protecting property and pets, animal control officials said.According to Ryan Warren, an animal control officer for the City of the Isle of Palms, there were 17 reports of coyote sightings in 2020, 107 in 2021 and 31 in 2022. The significant spike in 2021 was mostly due to a c...

Though coyote sightings were significantly down on the Isle of Palms in 2022, this largely has to do with the way sightings are recorded. The coyote dens, particularly in the Wild Dunes area of the island, are still active and coexistence is key when it comes to protecting property and pets, animal control officials said.

According to Ryan Warren, an animal control officer for the City of the Isle of Palms, there were 17 reports of coyote sightings in 2020, 107 in 2021 and 31 in 2022. The significant spike in 2021 was mostly due to a change in record-keeping on animal control’s part. Officers began to note coyote sightings posted on Facebook in 2021, but it quickly became too much for the officers to keep up with.

“It was too much for us. So we reverted to recording whoever calls about coyote sightings or if they see any footprints or scat, it’s recorded,” Warren said.

There was a single report of a coyote attacking a dog in 2022. Most reports come from calls about spotting the animal on the beach or near wooded areas. Though IOP has not recorded any coyote sightings in 2023 so far, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Biologist Jay Butfiloski said sightings may increase during the winter months.

“It’s not uncommon to see an increase in sightings during this time of the year as it coincides with breeding season, less foliage on some of the trees and shrubs making it a little easier to see farther into the woods in some places,” Butfiloski said.

Warren said that it’s common to see the coyotes in the early hours of the morning and later in the evenings on the beaches and in the dunes, especially near 26th Avenue. The coyotes are typically on the hunt for small rodents and rabbits. During the summer months, coyotes prey on Loggerhead turtle eggs.

Coyotes weigh around 30 to 45 pounds and have the appearance of a small dog. The animals are not native to the state and first appeared in South Carolina in the 1970s in the upstate. Since then, they have made their way to the Lowcountry, and now coyote populations are present in every county in the state. Warren said that coyotes are good swimmers, and will sometimes swim over from Dewees Island. This has created the “hotspot” in Wild Dunes.

The city of Isle of Palms, as well as the towns of Mount Pleasant and Sullivan’s Island, have coyote management plans to address the wild animal populations. “Hazing” is a method of deterring coyotes by making loud noises or throwing objects at the animals to instill fear. This fear of humans is key to coexisting peacefully and safely, as it will make coyotes less likely to attack or approach a human.

Butfiloski said that food is sparse, so coyotes may have to search more for something to eat, resulting in more sightings. It’s best to keep trash and small pets locked up to decrease the chances of a run-in with the animal.

“Keep pets and pet food indoors. If your pets are left outside, put their food or any food bowls away during the night as the residual smells can be an attractant to coyotes. Take down your bird feeders. Coyotes will not only eat the birdseed but also small mammals that visit these feeders,” Butfiloski said.

Sign up for updates!

Receive Moultrie News promotions directly to your inbox!

By submitting this form, you are consenting to receive marketing emails from: The Post and Courier, 148 Williman Street, Charleston, SC, 29403, US, https://www.postandcourier.com. You can revoke your consent to receive emails at any time by using the SafeUnsubscribe® link, found at the bottom of every email. Emails are serviced by Constant Contact.

Dominion Energy lists Sullivan’s Island Sand Dunes Club for sale with $19M offer in hand

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was us...

SULLIVAN’S ISLAND — Dominion Energy hopes to sell the Sand Dunes Club to a company owned by local billionaire Ben Navarro for $19 million, with plans in place to make it a club for island residents and property owners.

The historic beachfront venue was created in the 1950s after South Carolina Electric & Gas bought the 3.5 acres from the federal government for $27,000 as properties associated with Fort Moultrie were being sold.

With a large clubhouse, swimming pool, tennis courts and direct beach access, it was used for decades as a corporate retreat, by island residents and rented out for events and meetings. Dominion Energy acquired the property when it bought SCE&G.

The energy company sought the state Public Service Commission’s permission to sell the property for $19 million to a subsidiary of Navarro’s Beemok Capital called SDCC Island Resident Club. In February the commission instead required Dominion list the property for sale and solicit bids.

“This simply means that Dominion Energy will need to determine whether other potential buyers exist,” said Rhonda Maree O’Banion, Dominion’s media relations manager.

“After the competitive bidding process is complete, Dominion Energy will report back to the commission and if necessary, update its request for approval to sell the Sand Dunes property,” she added.

The sale to Navarro’s company has been anticipated on Sullivan’s Island, a barrier island with fewer than 2,000 residents where the average home sale price in 2021 was nearly $3.2 million according to the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors.

One year ago the town signed an agreement with Navarro’s company that laid out plans to potentially renovate the club and operate it for island residents.

Beemok, the February 2021 agreement says, “desires to purchase the property from its current owner, renovate the clubhouse and operate the club.”

The agreement also says “the town believes a club with membership limited to town residents and property owners” would be desirable if the club were sold.

“That’s what we were expecting was going to happen,” Sullivan’s Island Mayor Patrick O’Neil said. “Mr. Navarro and his group have worked closely with the town.”

The agreement is non-exclusive and the same conditions apply to the property regardless of who were to buy it, he said.

The agreement says the price of membership in the club would not exceed the cost of operating the club, and the town would get to review confidential financial statements to ensure that provision.

Residents and town property owners could become members, and nonmembers could still use the pool for a fee comparable to what municipal recreation departments charge in Mount Pleasant or on Isle of Palms, the agreement says.

The address is considered a large property that’s most valuable as a potential site for new homes according to an appraisal submitted by Dominion, but the clubhouse is protected as an historic structure and could not be demolished without the town’s permission.

The property would not be the first iconic Charleston-area locale purchased by Navarro’s companies if his bid is successful. His companies own the Charleston Place hotel, purchased last year for $350 million, and the Credit One Bank Stadium on Daniel Island.

Efforts to reach representatives of Beemok Capital and the company’s public relations firm by phone and email were unsuccessful Friday.

The sale of the property would not change Dominion Energy’s utility rates or pricing according to the company’s Public Service Commission filing.

In 2021 Dominion turned over more than 2,900 acres of property as part of a $165 million tax settlement with the S.C. Department of Revenue, resolving a three-year dispute over taxes owed on parts and materials purchased to build the V.C. Summer nuclear plant, which was not completed. The Sand Dunes Club was not a part of that deal, but other former clubs and retreats in Aiken, Lexington and Georgetown counties were, and some of those will be added to the state’s park system.

Brian Symmes, spokesman for Gov. Henry McMaster’s office, said the state had been interested in the Sand Dunes Club property, but the cost was too high.

“There was interest in it being part of the settlement agreement, but at the end of the day it was just much too expensive,” he said.

The more than 2,900 acres South Carolina acquired, which included the Pine Island Club on Lake Murray, cost the state about $50 million — the amount Dominion’s tax debt was reduced in exchange for those properties. The Sand Dunes Club property, less than 4 acres, would presumably have cost at least the $19 million Beemok Capital has offered, and make for an unusually expensive park purchase.

The tax settlement was a part of the relief provided to ratepayers, shareholders and governments who sued after Dominion’s predecessor SCE&G abruptly ended construction at the V.C. Summer site in 2017.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.