Pressure Washingin Summerville, SC

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Power Wash Summerville, SC

Summerville is one of the best places to live in the United States. Between city's history, its location, food, people, and climate, few places mix southern hospitality with laid-back vibes, quite like Summerville. As locals, we love calling The Holy City home, but living here comes with its challenges, especially if you are a home or business owner.

Due to the tropical-like weather and high humidity, surfaces like concrete and wood are often riddled with algae and mold, in addition to common grime and dirt. These natural occurrences can affect the beauty of your home or place of business, resulting in an unkempt, neglected look. That's where Palmetto Pressure Clean Summerville comes in - to restore your home or your business back to its original beauty and prevent unsightly growth and grime from re-occurring over time.

When it comes to pressure washing in Summerville, SC, we strive to provide our customers with industry-leading service, every time we are hired. While some pressure washing companies in Summerville are known for lazy workers and mediocre services, we make it a point to exceed our customer's expectations. We do so by prioritizing quick responses, extra-hard work, ongoing training, and excellent customer service. We stand behind our work - check out our reviews on Google!

We're the best choice to protect your home or business not only from mold and mildew but from bugs, bird's nests, spider webs, and potential damage caused by less experienced pressure washers in Summerville. Our customer's health, happiness, and satisfaction always come first. We are a licensed, insured pressure washing company in Summerville. When you hire our company, know that we will treat your home as if it were our own.

At the end of the day, our mission is simple: give our customers top-notch service and beautiful results while remaining friendly, approachable, and helpful. We specialize in two forms of pressure washing: residential and commercial. Keep reading to learn more about our pressure washer process and the benefits of each type of service.

SERVICE AREAS

Residential Pressure Washing in
Summerville, SC

When you own a home in the Lowcountry, its exterior is constantly exposed to the elements, resulting in mildew, dirt, and pollen. When not properly cleaned, the exterior surfaces of your home like brick, stucco, and vinyl suffer. With time, they can even break down. At Palmetto Pressure Clean Summerville, we use a specially-crafted cleaning solution and time-tested techniques to remove hazardous contaminants safely and effectively.

Unlike some pressure washers in Summerville, we use a no-to-low pressure washing strategy for residential properties. Also called "soft washing," this process includes washing and rinsing your windows, along with the exterior face of your gutters. High-pressure tactics are effective against mildew, but they run the risk of causing damage to your siding and windows. Our soft wash cleaner is specifically designed to remove mildew and algae gently, yet effectively from many porous surfaces. Our professional pressure washers also manually brush your gutters with a stain-removing agent to remove unsightly black streaks.

Our soft pressure washing process not only cleans your home but protects it from high-pressure techniques that damage your paint and siding. With soft washing, you won't have to worry about diminished curb appeal or reduced resale value of your home.

These techniques use gentle water pressure and at the same time, apply an environmentally friendly cleaning solution to remove contaminants. With this strategy, your plants and other landscaped areas won't suffer any damage, which is why many homeowners prefer going this route. Once the cleaning agent has removed mold, algae, etc., our team thoroughly rinses the exterior of your home. After rinsing, your home will be left with a squeaky-clean appearance that will make your neighbors jealous in the best way possible.

 Power Washer Summerville, SC

Our residential pressure washing services don't end with soft washing. Here is a quick glance at a few other commonly requested services from homeowners just like you:

High-pressure cleaning with hot water. Our high-pressure cleaning services are great for many different surfaces, like concrete, brick, and stone.

High-pressure cleaning

Gutter and roof debris removal with subsequent flush and removal of bagged debris from property.

Gutter and roof debris removal

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment to remove black staining and unsightly streaks resulting from algae, mold, and other contaminants.

Low-to-no pressure roof treatment

Cleaning of wood decks, fences, docks, decks, and more.

Cleaning of wood decks

Benefits of Residential Pressure Washing in Summerville, SC

Your home's exterior is exposed to harsh elements all the time. After all, its job is to keep the elements out so that you can enjoy life inside your home. Natural conditions like wind, dirt, sun, UV rays, birds, bugs, and insects - not to mention things like smoke, acid rain, and car exhaust - are constantly beating on your home. With time, your home becomes discolored, soiled, and even damaged.

If you own a home in Summerville, pressure washing is the most efficient and effective way to keep your home's exterior clean while safeguarding your time, family, and investment.

A few of the most common benefits of pressure washing include:

 Pressure Wash Summerville, SC

01

Pressure Washing Prevents Damage

When moisture builds up in the summer and winter months, it can cause serious damage to your home's surfaces. Should you let grime or stains remain on your exterior surfaces for a long time, it can result in permanent damage. Contaminants like mold actually feed off of your paint and other finishes, essentially removing these accents from your home. Throw in hard-to-reach areas like cracks and crevices that are notorious for mildew growth, and there's a lot of potential damage waiting.

Fortunately, a professional pressure washer in Summerville, SC, can remove dirt, grime, mold, and other contaminants that can cause damage over time. This protects your investment and helps keep your family healthy.

02

Pressure Washing Primes Surfaces for Painting

If you have plans to resurface, refinish, or repaint exterior portions of your home, pressure cleaning is a great way to prep your work area. By removing all grime and dirt from your work surface, you can be sure that you're working on a smooth, clean area free of grit. Pressure wash first if you're planning on other projects like re-staining your deck or refinishing your in-ground pool. Doing so will help your outdoor surfaces hold their new finish easier.

03

Pressure Washing Protects Your Family

According to the ACAAI, some of the most common allergic triggers are mold, dust mites, pollen, and mildew. These contaminants can be harmful to your health. Having your home and its surfaces pressure washed at least once a year can be very beneficial for your family's health. This is especially true for people who are sensitive to allergens and mold. By removing contaminants and allergens from your home's surfaces, you can help prevent your family from getting sick. One of the best times to consider pressure washing your home is in springtime, when allergens are present. Our eco-friendly pressure washing solution will help remove and kill fungus, algae, mold, and even bacteria.

Commercial Pressure Washing in Summerville, SC

If you own a business with a storefront, you know how important first impressions can be. When customers walk up to your store and see it covered in mold, mildew, dirt, and grime, they may have second thoughts about buying your products. After all, if you can't take the time to make your business presentable for customers, why would you put any effort into the service or product that you're selling?

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Summerville, we work with business owners across Summerville who know the value of a professionally cleaned storefront. Some just don't have the time to pressure wash their business themselves. Others prefer to rely on our team of professional pressure washers to get the job done right the first time. Whatever your commercial pressure washing needs may be, we are here to help.

We offer our unmatched pressure washing services to a number of different businesses and organizations in Summerville, including:

  • Business Storefronts
  • Offices
  • Restaurants
  • Dumpster Pads
  • Churches
  • Apartments
  • Schools
  • Sidewalks
  • Windows
  • Much More!

Call our office today at 843-593-6815 to learn more about our commercial pressure washing process, and to set up quarterly or monthly service to keep your storefront looking fresh and clean.

 Pressure Washer Summerville, SC

Benefits of Commercial Pressure Washing in Summerville, SC

When your commercial property takes a beating from the weather in Chucktown, the best way to achieve a clean, new look is with professional pressure washing. Our team uses high-pressure washing solutions for areas like parking lots, sidewalks, masonry, and concrete. We then use low-pressure washing techniques on your siding, windows, and other areas that need a gentler touch.

Additional benefits of commercial pressure washing include:

 Best Pressure Washer Summerville, SC

01

Commercial Pressure Washing Means Fewer Repairs

With time, dirt and grime will build up on your commercial structure's sides and roof. When you pressure wash regularly, you can prevent rot from taking hold in areas where fences, sidewalks, gutters, and other hard surfaces are common. In fact, our cleaning solutions can help prevent serious structural damage caused by mold, mildew, algae, and other contaminants.

02

Commercial Pressure Washing Helps Curb Appeal

If you are a business owner with a storefront, you have probably spent hours of time and thousands of dollars updating your facade. But when you don't take proper care of your businesses' exterior, all that time and money go to waste. Doing so gives customers a great first impression before they walk into your store. Additionally, you will almost certainly get higher offers on your store if it has been pressure washed and cleaned prior to listing it for sale.

03

Commercial Pressure Washing Creates a Healthier Environment

Pressure washing makes any commercial building cleaner, making it a healthier environment for customers and employees. Customers just feel better and more at ease when they shop in a store that is well cared for. They are also more likely to spend more time in your business and become repeat customers. Not only will customers enjoy the benefits of a cleaner building, but so will your employees. They'll be healthier, happier, and won't have to worry about health concerns from mold, mildew, and fungus. Happy, healthy employees mean more satisfied customers, which ultimately benefits your bottom line.

Trust the Palmetto Pressure Clean Difference

At Palmetto Pressure Clean Summerville, we are passionate about delivering quality pressure cleaning services for residential and commercial needs. We are committed to excellence, meaning our carefully selected pressure washers pay extra attention to detail and quality in every task they perform. We truly value each job, no matter how large or small they may be. Unlike some of our competitors in Summerville, we want to build relationships with our clients. We strive to get to know every home and business owner that we have the privilege of serving. Whether we're pressure washing a historic home off Queen Street or a popular business off King Street, we always aim to exceed expectations.

Interested in learning more info about our pressure washing services in Summerville? Curious whether pressure washing is appropriate for your home or business? Ready to set up an appointment? Our stellar team of customer service professionals is here to help, even if you have a couple of simple questions to ask.

When it's time to get cleaning, rely on the Palmetto Pressure Clean team to turn your dingy nightmare into a spick and span dream.

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Latest News in Summerville, SC

Animal shelters in SC are at a breaking point. Pet adoptions can’t keep up with intake

Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger buil...

Too many animals, not enough space — that’s been the mantra of humane societies and shelters throughout South Carolina for months.

The Charleston Animal Society on Sept. 1 called the situation a state of emergency, saying that almost every shelter in the state is “at the breaking point.”

Dorchester Paws took in 21 cats and kittens on Aug. 27 after a home burned down in Summerville, maxing out the already at-capacity shelter. In nearby Moncks Corner, Berkeley Animal Center has been in their new, larger building for a little over a year, but has so many animals it has resorted to using pop-up cages.

The Horry County Animal Care Center in Conway has had to temporarily close to treat animals after taking in over 170 animals in August.

In the upstate, Greenville County Animal Care has so many animals it is euthanizing some for space — something they hate doing, said Paula Church, the shelter’s community relations coordinator.

She said they look at animals with behavioral issues — for example, if a dog had bitten a child — and severe medical issues that would require lots of time and expense.

“If we had the time, we could find placement for them,” Church said. “But we don’t have months and months to find space for animals that have behavior and medical issues.”

Part of the problem was caused by the winding down of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns, which at first took the burden off shelters as more people adopted pets to keep families busy or to be company for employees working from home.

Joe Elmore, president and CEO of Charleston Animal Society, said shelters had been anticipating intake numbers to increase after that initial adoption surge. When lockdowns first began in 2020, the American Veterinary Medical Association recommended all veterinarians in the country pull back from elective procedures, such as spaying and neutering, so it would not tax the healthcare system.

“We usually do about 10,000 surgeries a year,” Elmore said. “But in the spring of 2020, when hospitals were overwhelmed, we stopped doing those elective type of procedures. We only did what was necessary and pulled back the number of public spay-neutering.”

Elmore said shelters are now seeing the results of putting off those surgeries, with more animals being born than there are people who can keep them.

Other factors also are at play. Of the 75 animal shelters in South Carolina, 75 percent of them do not have a veterinarian on staff, according to Elmore. This makes adoption harder because state law mandates the animals cannot be adopted unless they are fixed.

State law also says an animal that is brought to a shelter must be held for five days before being treated.

As people move in, animals move out

In areas like Charleston County, growth and development are also a factor in overcrowding. As more people and buildings push strays and feral animals out of their natural habitat, more of those animals are surrendered to shelters.

“We get calls from time to time here with people saying, ‘I’ve gotten deer in my yard, and I’ve never had deer in my yard.’ It’s because they’re being flushed out from the development,” Elmore said. “The same thing will happen with feral cats and dogs. Folks will then start calling animal control, animal control will go out and start bringing more and more of these animals in.”

Dorchester Paws, which has been operating over maximum capacity and been “in crisis mode” all summer, understands that growth and development in the Summerville area is having a huge impact on animals. Danielle Zuck, marketing and development director, said there are plans for Dorchester Paws to get a new, bigger building.

“Our building was designed to be a holding facility 50 years ago,” Zuck said. “It was not designed to have taken 4,000 animals a year, and that’s the number that we’re anticipating taking this year, if not more.”

Usually, Dorchester Paws takes in about 10 to 15 animals per day on average, Zuck said. Recently, it has been taking in 15 to 35 animals per day. That, combined with slower adoptions, is playing a big part in the overcrowding of the shelter.

“We’re constantly playing this jigsaw game of animals,” Zuck said.

Not only is the building old and too small to accommodate all of those pets, it also is in a flood zone. Every time it rains, Dorchester Paws is flooded and the animals in kennels are stuck standing in water, Zuck said. The staff has to take buckets to try and empty the shelter of floodwater.

In December, Dorchester Paws purchased land along Highway 17A — not in a flood zone. Now they’re in the midst of a financial campaign to help fund a new building on the property, one that will include a spay and neuter clinic. They are still in the process of figuring out the cost of building, but it’s estimated to cost somewhere between $3 and $8 million.

Zuck said Dorchester Paws is excited the new location will be in a growing neighborhood, right by the Palms and Summer’s Corner.

“Summerville is one of the fastest growing cities,” Zuck said. “We need the shelter badly in order to provide for the new population that’s coming in.”

A new building will also help Dorchester Paws elevate its status as a shelter, she added.

“A lot of people still don’t know that Dorchester Paws exists. They either call us the pound, or they don’t know where we’re located,” Zuck said. “A new shelter will just bring this brand up and elevate our mission for the animals.”

Right now, Dorchester Paws has over 400 animals in their care, with almost half of them living in a kennel or pop-up in the shelter.

Zuck said the shelter has made Dorchester Paws’ adoption process simple over the past year to try and incentivize people to adopt: just a one-page application, reduced fees and a conversation with an adoption counselor.

“We have removed all barriers from the adoption process,” Zuck said. “We want animals to be placed in loving homes.”

Zuck said it is hard to say why adoptions have been slow, but there could be several reasons: summer vacation, back-to-school, current world affairs.

One thing that isn’t a factor is a significant uptick in pets adopted in 2020 going back to shelters. Elmore said it is a myth that people surrendered their animals as soon as they returned to work.

“We saw some people who were returning to work actually coming back to adopt a companion animal for the animal,” Elmore said.

Finding homes

As a result of most shelters in the state being overcrowded, some are partnering up to ship animals to others that don’t have as many animals.

Elmore, of Charleston Animals Society, said they’ve started a statewide transport program where his staff takes animals to other local shelters, and even ones out of state. Some shelters Charleston Animals Society partners with include Hallie Hill Animal Sanctuary in Hollywood and the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty for Animals.

Church, of Greenville County Animal Care, said the shelter partners with rescue organizations almost daily to transport animals to other shelters. Some organizations they partner with include the Animal Sanctuary Society (New Jersey), Hearts of the North Rescue (Minnesota), Jackson’s Legacy (New York) and Lovable Mutts Adoption Center (Pennsylvania).

Tiffany Hoffman, event coordinator for Berkeley Animal Center, said the shelter is lined up with pop-ups.

“As much as I don’t want a dog in a pop-up, it’s still saving a life,” Hoffman said.

The center has recently relocated to a bigger building with more amenities, including a surgical suite, a meet-and-greet room and play yards. After being in the new building for 14 months, Hoffman said the staff are grateful they now have more space and are able to not just take better care of the animals they have, but also take in more.

“We are able to care for more animals, but with that, we need more fosters. We need more volunteers, more adopters,” Hoffman said. “With (the new building) comes the need for the community.”

Hoffman said there are many community members that already help. Those who foster pets are essential.

“We have a very hardworking staff, but we could not save the thousands of animals without the fosters,” Hoffman said.

Hoffman said fostering from Berkeley Animal Center is completely free, and they have a 24/7 phone service for fosters in case they have questions about the animal they’re taking care of. She said the center also provides food crates and medical care.

“We literally give everything needed,” Hoffman said. “They just have to give the love.”

Hoffman said the staff — a group of just over 10 — often fosters animals as well.

“Our staff work here because they love animals,” Hoffman said. “If you work in animal rescue, if you work in an animal shelter, you do it because of your love of an animal.”

Fast-growing Summerville welcomes 1,000-student capacity East Edisto Middle to Oakbrook

SUMMERVILLE — When eighth grade history teacher Charity Carpenter first walked into her classroom in the new East Edisto Middle School on Aug. 8, she had to leave again and walk around the building to work off her excitement.It was the Monday before school was set to start, and the hallways still smelled of new paint. Other teachers wheeled carts and trolleys full of equipment and school supplies into classrooms. Friends greeted each other, asking about each other’s summers or commenting on the new school.Around the...

SUMMERVILLE — When eighth grade history teacher Charity Carpenter first walked into her classroom in the new East Edisto Middle School on Aug. 8, she had to leave again and walk around the building to work off her excitement.

It was the Monday before school was set to start, and the hallways still smelled of new paint. Other teachers wheeled carts and trolleys full of equipment and school supplies into classrooms. Friends greeted each other, asking about each other’s summers or commenting on the new school.

Around the corner from her classroom, Carpenter bumped into fellow teacher Amy Baldwin, who was directing students from her Gateway to Technology class how to unload her computers and robotics equipment. The students had been in Baldwin’s class in previous years at Oakbrook Middle School and had volunteered to help her unpack her new classroom.

“How’s your room looking?” Baldwin asked Carpenter.

“I just walked in and I just had to leave my stuff there and take a walk,” Carpenter said. “I was just overwhelmed.”

East Edisto is the biggest school she’s ever been in, Carpenter told The Post and Courier. And the numbers back her up. The 120,000-square-foot school cost $31 million and took 16 months to complete. It’s located off S.C. Highway 61 behind Beech Hill Elementary. At full capacity, it can hold 1,000 students.

When school officially begins on Aug. 15, it will welcome 850.

“We’re pretty close to what we can hold,” Principal Brion Rutherford said, adding that it’s located in the Oakbrook area, one of the fastest-growing parts of Dorchester County.

“There are a number of new neighborhoods going in,” he said. “We’ll be at our capacity pretty quickly.”

He and Shane Robbins, the new superintendent of Dorchester School District 2, said the new school is a factor of growth not only throughout the district but also in the Oakbrook area near the Ashley River.

A superintendent for 15 years at various districts, Robbins is no stranger to new school construction.

“There is so much excitement for students, families, teachers and staff members to move into a brand-new structure and make it their own and their home,” Robbins said.

‘Exploding’ with growth

Nestled in the Oakbrook area, the school is surrounded by large and growing housing developments like Legend Oaks Plantations and Summers Corner, which are adding thousands of homes in the coming years.

Cheyenne and Brennan Ledyard live in Drayton Oaks, a small subdivision about a three-minute drive from East Edisto Middle. Like many residents in the area, they’re still fairly new, having moved in when the neighborhood went up about two years ago.

They say the Oakbrook area, particularly the neighborhoods on either side of Highway 61, is “exploding.”

“We’re having tremendous growth on this side,” Cheyenne said.

Last year, their son Hudson attended Gregg Middle School, on the other side of Dorchester Road and the Ashley River. Now he’s starting seventh grade at East Edisto.

“He is very excited because this bus arrives about 20 minutes later than what he had to ride last year,” Brennan said with a laugh.

She and Cheyenne said they feel the middle school is warranted, especially since there are already two elementary schools in the area, Beech Hill and Sand Hill. Their only concern is that traffic on Highway 61 might be worse in the mornings now.

Down Highway 61 in Summers Corner, Michelle Cheslek was riding her bike with her 6-year-old daughter Olivia on a recent afternoon. And even though Olivia still has several years before she goes to middle school, Cheslek said she’s already relieved there’s one that close.

“Otherwise I think she would have been going to Gregg, which is a little farther away,” Cheslek said.

Like the Ledyards, Cheslek said the area is growing. Her family just closed on their house in May, and behind them, construction is underway on more houses.

Growth in the school district isn’t anything new. DD2′s student population has grown from around 16,000 students in the 2000-01 school year to more than 25,000 last year.

Managing growth

Despite population growth in Summerville, the district’s student population saw a slight dip during the pandemic, according to DD2. During the 2019-20 school year, there were 26,194 students at the school. This past year, there were 25,404.

“If you look at our numbers from the end of last school year, they replicate our numbers from the 2014-15 school year,” Robbins said, referencing a year with 25,175 students.

Robbins said that’s a factor of the pandemic.

“That’s a symptom of students that stayed in a virtual environment not associated with the school or possibly went the home-school route, and ... that wasn’t a Dorchester 2 issue or trend,” he said. “That’s something we saw across the state and honestly across the country.”

While those numbers have started to come back, Robbins said the bigger change is where the students are.

“What I think you’re seeing is a shift where geographically people are living in the county and where the population shifts have occurred,” he said. “For us, there is going to be growth that we’re going to rebound from post-COVID, so we need to have a long-term facilities study completed or updated.”

Robbins said East Edisto is about the average size of a middle school, and he doesn’t want it to get much larger than 1,000 students. He does believe the district will see more growth in the coming years and should have a plan to deal with that.

But he would rather utilize space in schools throughout the district before building any more schools.

“When you see numbers shift like that ... you look at the occupancy of each facility and, in lieu of building a new structure because one structure is at capacity, you look at, ‘OK, how can I adjust the attendance lines to make sure all my structures are at capacity before I have to go to the taxpayers and ask for money to build for more structures?’ ”

In other words, the district will look at occupancy levels at each school and send students to schools with more room.

That can be “emotional” for the community, he said, which is why the district should have a formalized plan in place. That would be an involved process that looks at everything from county population projections to roads, bridges and “potential obstacles” along bus routes.

“There’s a lot that goes into play when you look at making a decision on what’s going to work best, but the overall goal is to try to fully maximize all of our facilities so that we don’t have to consistently add on and build new structures because there’s growth in one particular geographical area,” Robbins said.

Earlier this year, district officials reported East Edisto was on track to be over-capacity within a few years of its opening. Robbins said that should only be a problem if the district doesn’t put those plans in place.

“There is a lot of growth in that area,” he said. “If we stayed status quo and we didn’t look at those things, absolutely it would end up being overcrowded.”

New opportunities for students

Baldwin is well aware of the growth. Not only will this be her 23rd year teaching in the district, but she attended DD2 schools from kindergarten to high school. That growth brings more opportunities for students, she said.

Take her subject, Gateway to Technology, which covers STEM subjects like robotics, design and engineering.

“That was such a small class back (when I first started teaching), and now it’s bloomed and blossomed and we have all these engineering avenues,” she said. “I have a sixth grader entering school, and the number of choices of classes, things like piano, that didn’t exist when I was a student ... So just the opportunities our district has brought as it’s grown has been really wonderful.”

Rutherford said he had some input on the classrooms and other features while construction was underway, such as what kind of designs and furniture would best promote collaboration in STEM classrooms and where best to put electives so that they’re located close to the sixth grade hallway.

One important aspect of the design was safety features, he said. Those include cameras, alarm systems that will alert people when exterior doors are left open and a crosswalk across Highway 61 that will be manned during school drop-off and dismissal. There will also be a dedicated office for the school’s social worker to help address students’ mental health needs.

Rutherford echoed Baldwin’s excitement for the array of opportunities — and praised Gateway to Technology in particular. He said Baldwin and the program she set up at Oakbrook have won multiple awards throughout the state. The same goes for chorus teacher Maurice Burgess, he said, who will run East Edisto’s fine arts programs.

“I might be partial to this, but I think we have the best teachers in the school district, if not the Lowcountry,” Rutherford said.

One of SC’s biggest movie theater chains is in bankruptcy

The fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic caught up with the parent of South Carolina’s largest movie theater chain on Sept. 7, when the global holding company filed for U.S. bankruptcy protection in Texas.Cineworld Group LLC is struggling under nearly $5 billion in debt at a time when box-office sales and attendance figures are rebounding from the health crisis at a slower-than-expected pace.Day-to-day operations at the company’s U.S.-based Regal Cinemas and other businesses are not expected to be disrupted by the fil...

The fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic caught up with the parent of South Carolina’s largest movie theater chain on Sept. 7, when the global holding company filed for U.S. bankruptcy protection in Texas.

Cineworld Group LLC is struggling under nearly $5 billion in debt at a time when box-office sales and attendance figures are rebounding from the health crisis at a slower-than-expected pace.

Day-to-day operations at the company’s U.S.-based Regal Cinemas and other businesses are not expected to be disrupted by the filing. Cineworld said it plans to pay vendors and honor customer loyalty and membership programs.

“The pandemic was an incredibly difficult time for our business, with the enforced closure of cinemas and huge disruption to film schedules that has led us to this point,” CEO Mooky Greidinger said in a written statement. “This latest process is part of our ongoing efforts to strengthen our financial position and is in pursuit of a de-leveraging that will create a more resilient capital structure and effective business.”

U.K.-based Cineworld and its subsidiaries have lined up $1.94 billion in financing from existing lenders, which will enable them to operate as usual during the court-supervised financial restructuring

Cineworld expects to exit from bankruptcy by April next year.

Last month, the British company, which operates in 10 countries, said its theaters remained “open for business as usual” as rumors swirled about a possible reorganization.

Cineworld’s debt load totals $4.8 billion in debt, not including real estate lease liabilities.

The company and its lawyers will be negotiating with lenders and other creditors in the months ahead to reduce its financial obligations. It also will be looking to renegotiate rents with landlords “to improve U.S. cinema lease terms in an effort to further position the group for long-term growth,” the company said.

Cineworld, which employs about 28,000 workers, previously said that admissions have recently come in below expectations. A “limited” slate of new releases suggests its financial stress likely won’t ease until at least the holiday film season kicks off in November, putting more short-term pressure on its balance sheet.

According to the data firm Comscore, U.S. summer box office sales of $3.3 billion as of Aug. 21 are lagging the comparable pre-pandemic period of 2019 by about 20 percent.

In South Carolina, Regal reopened most of its 15 theaters after a lengthy shutdown in the spring of 2021, making it one of the industry’s last holdouts. The chain has since sold and shuttered its Regal Cinebarre multiscreen location on Houston Northcutt Boulevard in Mount Pleasant and the Regal Columbia Cinema in Richland Mall.

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Contact John McDermott at 843-937-5572 or follow him on Twitter at @byjohnmcdermott

Maritime Sustainment Technology and Innovation Consortium Hits Milestone 300th Member

SUMMERVILLE, S.C., Sept. 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Maritime Sustainment Technology and Innovation Consortium (MSTIC), established by The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division (NSWCPD), is pleased to announce the achievement of its milestone 300th member. That member is Systel, Inc. located out of Sugar Land, Texas. Systel designs and manufactures rugged computing...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C., Sept. 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- The Maritime Sustainment Technology and Innovation Consortium (MSTIC), established by The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Philadelphia Division (NSWCPD), is pleased to announce the achievement of its milestone 300th member. That member is Systel, Inc. located out of Sugar Land, Texas. Systel designs and manufactures rugged computing solutions purpose-built for mission-critical applications in austere environments.

Established in June 2021, MSTIC focuses on innovative sustainment solutions to effectively address current and future security threats in maritime environments. The consortium brings together traditional and non-traditional government contractors, small and large businesses, for-profit and not-for-profit entities, and academic organizations collaborating to perform research and development and prototyping efforts. Their goal is to develop and mature technologies in the field of Maritime Sustainment that enhance the Navy's mission effectiveness.

"MSTIC is delighted to welcome our 300th member to the consortium. Our members' capabilities align with solutions for which the Government is looking and the collaboration among them yields the relationships, teaming, and innovative ideas that deliver those solutions at mission speed," stated Program Manager, Tim Macon with Advanced Technology International (ATI).

"Systel is proud to be a part of this collaborative effort to deliver the solutions that our Government needs to support maritime sustainment and deliver advantage for any mission," said Systel CEO, Vimal Kothari. "We have delivered thousands of systems for maritime applications over the past 30 years with a relentless commitment to enabling mission success; MSTIC is precisely aligned with that commitment and provides a great way to connect with other like-minded leading innovators."

MSTIC is managed by ATI.

ABOUT ATI

ATI, a public-service nonprofit based in Summerville, South Carolina, builds and manages collaborations that conduct research and development of new technologies to solve our nation's national security challenges. Fueled by a community of experts from industry, academia, and government, ATI accelerates impact by using the power of collaboration to help the federal government quickly acquire novel technologies. ATI is a subsidiary of Analytic Services, Inc. (ANSER), a public-service research institute organized as a nonprofit corporation, which is dedicated to informing decisions that shape the nation's future.

ATI.org | LinkedIn | Twitter | collaborATIon app

SOURCE Maritime Sustainment Technology and Innovation Consortium (MSTIC)

Parking concerns arise over potential location for future Dorchester Co. library in Summerville

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Dorchester County has set aside over nine million dollars to build a new library branch in downtown Summerville, but neighbors are concerned over its possible location.A two-story, 15,000-square-foot library could soon be built in front of the Summerville Family YMCA. It’s one of three planned libraries in the lower part of Dorchester County.However, the location off Doty Avenue has drawn parking concerns from business owners and neighbors.“I think that this is a good bad idea,&rdqu...

SUMMERVILLE, S.C. (WCSC) - Dorchester County has set aside over nine million dollars to build a new library branch in downtown Summerville, but neighbors are concerned over its possible location.

A two-story, 15,000-square-foot library could soon be built in front of the Summerville Family YMCA. It’s one of three planned libraries in the lower part of Dorchester County.

However, the location off Doty Avenue has drawn parking concerns from business owners and neighbors.

“I think that this is a good bad idea,” business owner Diane Frankenberger said, “and I think there’s gotta be another place for it where there’s just more parking. Parking’s the issue.”

County Administrator Jason Ward says he believes the library will serve a smaller radius than its current library on Trolley Road, which it will replace once complete.

“When you go from one facility, like the one on Trolley Road, to three facilities, you’re going to have a dispersion of the parking,” Ward said. “You’re not going to have everyone that’s going to the Trolley branch come to downtown .”

Frankenberger said the proposed site will hurt both the library and the YMCA.

She and neighbors say instead of building the facility there, the library should go across the railroad tracks onto the former site of the town’s public safety headquarters, which they say could provide ample space for parking.

However, the county disagrees, saying the YMCA site is the most walkable.

“While [the old public safety building] is a location that some have looked at for different purposes, we really feel the location that we have provides kind of the old four corners concept,” Ward said.

Neighbors said they’re not against having a library built downtown, but they want a place where people won’t have to stress out about where to park.

“I’d like to get peace in my heart, and I know other people would too, about where folks are going to park, and that those studies have been done,” Frankenberger said.

Joseph Debney, the Summerville Family YMCA’s CEO, released the following statement:

We, at the Summerville Family YMCA, are invested in this community. Our parking provides over 100 spaces to our members. We have and will continue to work with our local businesses, residents, and elected officials to address the need for parking in Summerville.

To that end, we have had many discussions regarding bike sharing and improved pedestrian and bike trails to encourage safety and greater access to our downtown and Oakbrook areas. We believe that creating this access improves equitability for all in our community.

We will continue to work with the county and town on projects that improve the quality of life for all Dorchester County residents through community partnerships, workforce development, removing barriers to transportation accessibility.

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